Water Resources

Climate change and peak flows: Knowledge-to-action to help managers address impacts on streamflow dynamics and aquatic habitat

Pacific Northwest Research Station
Research Partners: 
Oregon State University
Principal Investigator(s): 
Gordon Grant, Anne Nolin, Becky Flitcroft
Summary: 

What will the rivers of the Pacific Northwest look like in the future? Will they be stable or unstable? Will they have salmon or other species? Will the waters be cold and clear or warm and muddy? These questions motivate our study of the effects of climate warming on streams draining the Cascade Mountains.

Previous studies have shown that snowpacks throughout the Cascades are highly vulnerable to warming temperatures, readily changing from snow to rain, and melting earlier. Less certain is how these changes are likely to affect streamflows, particularly in streams that derive much of their flow from deep groundwater and springs. These groundwater streams, which are currently characterized by very stable bed, banks, and vegetation, are particularly sensitive to increasing peak flows in the winter. We want to know how changing snowpacks and increased peak flows are likely to affect these channels, potentially changing their suitability as habitat for threatened species such as bull trout and spring Chinook. Results from our work, which include field and modeling components, will be used to guide management decisions affecting these streams: how dams are operated, whether water suppliers need to worry about turbidity, and how we should manage riparian vegetation.

Project Status: 
Action
Record Entry Date: 
Tue, 09/23/2014

Coupling snowpack and groundwater dynamics to interpret historical streamflow trends in the western United States

Pacific Northwest Research Station
Research Partners: 
Oregon State University
Principal Investigator(s): 
Gordon Grant, Mohammad Safeeq
Summary: 

A key challenge for resource and land managers is predicting the consequences of climate warming on streamflow and water resources. Over the last century in the western US, significant reductions in snowpack and earlier snowmelt have led to an increase in the fraction of annual streamflow during winter, and a decline in the summer. This study explores the relative roles of snowpack accumulation and melt, and landscape characteristics or 'drainage efficiency', in influencing streamflow. An analysis of streamflow during 1950-2010 for 81 watersheds across the western US indicates that summer streamflows in watersheds that drain slowly from deep groundwater and receive precipitation as snow are most sensitive to climate warming. During the spring, however, watersheds that drain rapidly and receive precipitation as snow are most sensitive to climate warming. Our results indicate that not all trends in the western US are associated with changes in snowpack dynamics; we observe declining streamflow in late fall and winter in rain-dominated watersheds as well. These empirical findings have implications for how streamflow sensitivity to warming is interpreted across broad regions.

Project Abstract: 

See more below

Project Status: 
Complete
Research Results: 

Coupling snowpack and groundwater dynamics to interpret historical stream flow trends in the western United States - http://www.fsl.orst.edu/wpg/pubs/13_Safeeqetal_HP.pdf

Record Entry Date: 
Tue, 09/23/2014

Watershed Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP)

Overview & Applicability

The Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP), is a physically-based soil erosion prediction technology. WEPP has a number of customized interfaces developed for common applications such as roads, managed forests, forests following wildfire, and rangelands. It also has a large database of cropland soils and vegetation scenarios. The WEPP model is a distributed parameter, continuous simulation model, and is able to describe a given erosion concern in great detail for an experienced user.

Summary: 

The WEPP model consists of multiple applications that can estimate erosion and sediment processes on hillslopes and small watersheds, taking into account climate, land use, site disturbances, vegetation, and soil properties.

NorEaST - Stream Temperature Web Portal

Overview & Applicability

Stream data are needed to enable managers to understand baseline conditions, historic trends, and potential impacts of climate change on stream temperature and flow, and in turn on aquatic species in freshwater ecosystems.

Summary: 

NorEaST is being developed to provide a coordinated, multi-agency regional web portal to compile, store, map, and distribute continuous stream temperature locations and data across the Northeastern U.S.

Introduction of Spatially Explicit Climate Scenarios for the Bull Trout

Map of stream temperatures

Many new tools are becoming available to provide downscaled climate data and help us make management decisions. How do these tools perform when used in an excersize to examine real-world problems? See the example of an exercise done for Bull Trout.

Presenter: 
Dan Isaak
Publication date: 
03/01/2011

Stream Temperature & Climate Change: Observed Patterns & Key Uncertainties

Fly fisherman in a stream

Stream temperature measurements indicate that streams are warming in response to climate change. However more data are needed to accurately predict stream temperature changes for the future, and their biological implications.

Presenter: 
Dan Isaak
Publication date: 
03/01/2011
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