Water Resources

Watershed Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP)

Overview & Applicability

The Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP), is a physically-based soil erosion prediction technology. WEPP has a number of customized interfaces developed for common applications such as roads, managed forests, forests following wildfire, and rangelands. It also has a large database of cropland soils and vegetation scenarios. The WEPP model is a distributed parameter, continuous simulation model, and is able to describe a given erosion concern in great detail for an experienced user.

Summary: 

The WEPP model consists of multiple applications that can estimate erosion and sediment processes on hillslopes and small watersheds, taking into account climate, land use, site disturbances, vegetation, and soil properties.

NorEaST - Stream Temperature Web Portal

Overview & Applicability

Stream data are needed to enable managers to understand baseline conditions, historic trends, and potential impacts of climate change on stream temperature and flow, and in turn on aquatic species in freshwater ecosystems.

Summary: 

NorEaST is being developed to provide a coordinated, multi-agency regional web portal to compile, store, map, and distribute continuous stream temperature locations and data across the Northeastern U.S.

Introduction of Spatially Explicit Climate Scenarios for the Bull Trout

Map of stream temperatures

Many new tools are becoming available to provide downscaled climate data and help us make management decisions. How do these tools perform when used in an excersize to examine real-world problems? See the example of an exercise done for Bull Trout.

Presenter: 
Dan Isaak
Publication date: 
03/01/2011

Stream Temperature & Climate Change: Observed Patterns & Key Uncertainties

Fly fisherman in a stream

Stream temperature measurements indicate that streams are warming in response to climate change. However more data are needed to accurately predict stream temperature changes for the future, and their biological implications.

Presenter: 
Dan Isaak
Publication date: 
03/01/2011

Effects of Changing Flow Regimes on Stream Physical Habitat

Remotely sensed image of streambed

Climate-induced changes in streamflow will alter physical stream habitats, including their timing, size, and connectivity. New technologies are developing for examining these changes.

Presenter: 
Jim McKean
Publication date: 
03/01/2011
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