Wildlife

Climate change and Greater Sage-grouse habitat interactions in southeastern Oregon

Contact First Name: 
Megan
Contact Last Name: 
Creutzberg
Contact 2 First Name: 
Miles
Contact 2 Last Name: 
Hemstrom
Principal Investigator(s): 
Megan Creutzberg
Research Partners: 
Portland State University, USGS Climate Center
FS Research Station(s): 
Pacific Northwest Research Station
Summary: 

This project will connect state and transition models developed as a part of the Integrated Landscape Assessment Project with Dynamic Global Vegetation Model outputs for Southeastern Oregon. The objective is to develop a set of vegetation modeling tools that can be used by local land managers and collaborative groups to examine potential rangeland management scenarios and interactions with possible climate change impacts.

Geographic Region: 
United States
Pacific Northwest Region (R6)
Oregon
Project Status: 
Action
Record Entry Date: 
Tue, 09/16/2014

Climate and breeding phenology of anuran species in Texas

Contact First Name: 
Daniel
Contact Last Name: 
Saenz
FS Research Station(s): 
Southern Research Station
Summary: 

Changing weather patterns from global climate change could be a contributing factor in declining frog populations, particularly for species that rely on ephemeral water sources, like some of those in eastern Texas. Scientists in Nacogdoches, TX are currently studying the effects of rainfall and temperature on the breeding activities of 13 different species of frogs in eastern Texas. Information from the research will make it possible to predict potential effects of a changing climate on frog populations.

Geographic Region: 
United States
Southern Region (R8)
Texas
Project Status: 
Action

Climate Change and Herpetofauna

Contact First Name: 
Dede
Contact Last Name: 
Olson
Summary: 

Climate change is expected to affect amphibians through a number of direct and indirect mechanisms. This project focuses on examining several of these mechanisms, as well as potential management responses, including:

  • "Shrinking heads hypothesis" - How do forested headwater streams respond to low water years? Do riparian buffers mitigate shrinking heads effects?
  • Over-ridge connectivity designs for forested amphibians.
  • Climate associations of the amphibian chytrid fungus.
  • Long-term monitoring of anuran breeding dates in the Cascade Range.
Geographic Region: 
United States
Project Status: 
Action

Effects of climate change and other factors on a lizard community in an ecotone in southeastern Arizona.

Contact First Name: 
Lawrence C.
Contact Last Name: 
Jones
Summary: 

Lizards are expected to be an early warning system of impending change in vegetation communities, and a useful tool in predicting adaptive management needs. This study is conducted in the area with the highest diversity of lizards in the USA, situated at an ecotone between two deserts and a mountain range. Changes in the lizard community are expected sooner in this ecotone than in distinct habitat types, and are also expected to precede observed changes in vegetation.

Geographic Region: 
United States
Southwestern Region (R3)
Arizona
Project Status: 
Action

Conservation of the Louisiana Pine Snake

Contact First Name: 
Daniel
Contact Last Name: 
Saenz
Principal Investigator(s): 
Daniel Saenz
FS Research Station(s): 
Southern Research Station
Summary: 

One of North America’s rarest reptiles, the Louisiana pine snake, may require extra assistance to persist under climate change. Scientists with the Southern Research Station are developing an RRTH (relocation, reintroduction, translocation, headstarting) project for these reptiles.

Geographic Region: 
United States
Southern Region (R8)
Project Status: 
Action

Climate Change and Reptile Habitat in the northwestern U.S.

Contact First Name: 
Dede
Contact Last Name: 
Olson
Principal Investigator(s): 
Dede Olson
Research Partners: 
PARC (Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation)
FS Research Station(s): 
Pacific Northwest Research Station
Summary: 

Understanding reptile distributions and how they might be affected by climate change can help guide the management of these species. Research activities include:

  • Modeling landscape-scale factors including climate metrics associated with northwestern reptile distributions.
  • Examining potential habitat ‘hot spots’ for reptiles in coastal Oregon mesic forests.
Geographic Region: 
United States
Pacific Northwest Region (R6)
Oregon
Project Status: 
Action

Park Science Special Issue: Climate Change Science in the National Parks

Park Science is a research and resource management bulletin from the National Park Service. This Special Issue is focused on climate change effects on National Parks and management options.

RPA Assessment and Climate Change

Examining the condition of a forest stand

The 2010 RPA assessments provide a snapshot of current U.S. forest and rangeland conditions, and project conditions 50 years into the future to 2060.

Presenter: 
Linda Joyce
Publication date: 
11/17/2010
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