Eastern Region (R9)

COLE (Carbon OnLine Estimator)

Overview & Applicability

COLE is a versatile and appropriate tool to use for a wide range of carbon estimation needs. COLE draws from Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) data to provide basic carbon inventory and growth-and-yield estimates for a particular forest, region, or state. While COLE draws from FIA plot data, the data is aggregated at the county or national forest level, so analysis can occur at this level or higher.

COLE map interface
Summary: 

COLEv2.0 enables the user to examine forest carbon characteristics of any area of the continental United States.

Forecasts of Climate-Associated Shifts in Tree Species (ForeCASTS)

Overview & Applicability

Forecasts of Climate-Associated Shifts in Tree Species (ForeCASTS) generates maps that depict future suitable habitat ranges for 213 North American tree species, in the United States and globally. It does this by using projections of future climate in combination with the concept of fine-scale, ecoregions—land areas that share similar environmental characteristics, such as soils, topography, and climate variables.

current habitat map from ForeCASTS
Summary: 

Using projections of future climate, ForeCASTS produces maps that depict future suitable habitat ranges for North American tree species in the United States and globally.

Forest Vegetation Simulator (FVS)

Overview & Applicability

The Forest Vegetation Simulator (FVS) is a family of forest growth simulation models that can simulate a wide range of silvicultural treatments for most major forest tree species, forest types, and stand conditions. "Suppose" is the name for the graphical user interface for FVS. FVS is useful from a stand to a landscape level.

post-processing FVS output
Summary: 

The Forest Vegetation Simulator (FVS) is a family of forest growth simulation models that allow a user to explore how silvicultural treatments may affect growth and yield and, therefore, carbon stocks.

First Order Fire Effects Model (FOFEM)

Overview & Applicability

First order fire effects are the immediate consequences of a fire, whether direct or indirect. The FOFEM tool is designed to calculate these consequences for prescribed fire or wildfire using four separate metrics: tree mortality, fuel consumption, emissions or smoke production, and soil heating. This tool is intended for direct use in assessing fire impacts and severity, planning prescribed fires that accomplish resource needs, and other applications.

Burned forest
Summary: 

FOFEM is a model that predicts first-order fire effects including tree mortality, fuel consumption, emissions (smoke) production, and soil heating caused by prescribed burning or wildfire.

Seedlot Selection Tool

Overview & Applicability

The SST is currently experiencing problems. Developers are working on getting the tool operational again (2/24/15).

The Seedlot Selection Tool (SST) is a web-based decision-support tool designed to help forest managers match seedlots (seed collections from a known origin) with planting sites based on climatic information.

Seedlot Selection Tool Map of Oregon
Summary: 

The Seedlot Selection Tool (SST) can help users match seedlots (seed collections from a known origin) with appropriate planting sites based on climatic information.

LANDFIRE (Landscape Fire and Resource Management Planning Tools)

Overview & Applicability

LANDFIRE (Landscape Fire and Resource Management Planning Tools) is a vegetation, fire and fuel characteristics mapping program. LANDFIRE data products consist of over 50 spatial data layers including: Existing Vegetation Type, Canopy, and Height; Biophysical Settings; Environmental Site Potential; Fire Behavior Fuel Models; Fire Regime Classes; and Fire Effects layers.

LANDFIRE map of vegetation change
Summary: 

LANDFIRE (Landscape Fire and Resource Management Planning Tools) is a vegetation, fire and fuel characteristics mapping program.

Determining the sensitivity of eastern US fire regimes to climate change

Southern Research Station
Eastern Forest Environmental Threat Assessment Center
Summary: 

Scientists are working to better understand fire across the landscape to help land managers effectively restore fire-dependent ecosystems and address future risks. This research can support social and forest management actions to mitigate climate change impacts.

Project Status: 
Action

Cumulative Effects of Succession, Management, and Disturbance on Forest Landscapes

Northern Research Station
Research Partners: 
University of Missouri, Columbia
Principal Investigator(s): 
Stephen Shifley
Summary: 

For more than 15 years we have worked together with collaborators from other institutions to develop and apply methods to forecast landscape-scale forest change in response to tree growth and species succession as well as disturbance from timber harvest and fire. Much of this work has utilized the LANDIS model to forecast changes in forest conditions for management and disturbance scenarios applied. We have demonstrated the capabilities of these tools to analyze the cumulative effects of management scenarios applied to real forest landscapes in Indiana and Missouri.

Project Status: 
Action

Northern Forest Ecosystem Experiment: Aspen Regeneration and Carbon Cycling

Northern Research Station
Research Partners: 
Michigan Technological University, University of Idaho, University of Wisconsin, University of Michigan
Principal Investigator(s): 
Mark E. Kubiske
Summary: 

The Northern Forest Ecosystem Experiment is a large-scale, long-term field experiment in which harvested forests regenerate in atmospheres with enhanced concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2), ozone (O3) or both gasses combined. This Experiment takes place on the same site as the 11-year Aspen FACE Experiment, following the final data collection for the Aspen FACE project in 2009.

Project Status: 
Action

Modeling potential future habitats for trees and birds in the eastern U.S.

Northern Research Station
Principal Investigator(s): 
Louis Iverson
Summary: 

The Landscape Change Research Group, from the Delaware, OH lab of the Northern Research Station, has been modeling potential changes in suitable habitat for trees and birds of the eastern US. These maps are available online at www.nrs.fs.fed.us/atlas. We also look at dispersal potentials through another modeling toolset, and work with modification factors to understand more about the factors not readily modeled.

Project Abstract: 

See more below

Project Status: 
Action
Research Results: 

Publications:

Prasad, A., L.Iverson, S.Matthews, M. Peters. 2009. Atlases of tree and bird species habitats for current and future climates. Ecological Restoration. 27: 260-263.

Iverson, L., A. M. Prasad, S. Matthews, and M. Peters. 2011. Lessons learned while integrating habitat, dispersal, disturbance, and life-history traits into species habitat models under climate change. Ecosystems. 14(6):1005-1020. 

Matthews, S. N., L. R. Iverson, A. M. Prasad, and M. P. Peters. 2011. Potential habitat changes of 147 North American bird species to redistribution of vegetation and climate following predicted climate change. Ecography. 34:933-945.

Iverson, L. R., A. M. Prasad, S. N. Matthews, and M. Peters. 2008. Estimating potential habitat for 134 eastern US tree species under six climate scenarios. Forest Ecology and Management. 254:390-406.

Matthews, S. N., L. R. Iverson, A. M. Prasad, M. P. Peters, and P. G. Rodewald. 2011. Modifying climate change habitat models using tree species-specific assessments of model uncertainty and life history factors. Forest Ecology and Management. 262:1460-1472.

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