Southern Region (R8)

National Climate Change Viewer

Overview & Applicability

The National Climate Change Viewer allows users to visualize projected changes in climate (maximum and minimum air temperature and precipitation) and the water balance (snow water equivalent, runoff, soil water storage and evaporative deficit) for any state, county and USGS Hydrologic Units (HUC) in the continental United States. USGS HUCs are hierarchical units associated with watersheds and analogous to states and counties that span multistate areas. HUC levels 2, 4 and 8 are used in the viewer.

Summary: 

This viewer allows users to visualize past and projected changes in climate and the water balance for any state, county and USGS Hydrologic Unit.

Our Forests, Our Solutions: How Climate Change Affects Forests

Storyboard from the video

Climate change means changes for the nation's forests. This introductory video describes some of the changes that are occurring and that are expected as the planet warms.

Presenter: 
The Climate Change Resource Center
Publication date: 
07/25/2014

Watershed Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP)

Overview & Applicability

The Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP), is a physically-based soil erosion prediction technology. WEPP has a number of customized interfaces developed for common applications such as roads, managed forests, forests following wildfire, and rangelands. It also has a large database of cropland soils and vegetation scenarios. The WEPP model is a distributed parameter, continuous simulation model, and is able to describe a given erosion concern in great detail for an experienced user.

Summary: 

The WEPP model consists of multiple applications that can estimate erosion and sediment processes on hillslopes and small watersheds, taking into account climate, land use, site disturbances, vegetation, and soil properties.

Southern Regional Extension Forestry

The Southern Regional Extension Forestry Office facilitates programming among professionals who work on many issues and opportunities facing the forestry and natural resources communities, including climate change.

Pine Integrated Network: Education, Mitigation, and Adaptation project (PINEMAP)

PINEMAP integrates research, extension, and education to enable southern pine landowners to manage forests to increase carbon sequestration; increase efficiency of nitrogen and other fertilizer inputs; and adapt forest management approaches to increase forest resilience and sustainability under variable climates.

National Climate Assessment 2014

This peer-reviewed report is a thorough and comprehensive overview of how climate change is expected to affect the United States. It includes analyses of impacts on seven sectors – human health, water, energy, transportation, agriculture, forests, and ecosystems. The report also assesses U.S. regional impacts and outlines some climate adaptation efforts.

Climate and breeding phenology of anuran species in Texas

Contact First Name: 
Daniel
Contact Last Name: 
Saenz
FS Research Station(s): 
Southern Research Station
Summary: 

Changing weather patterns from global climate change could be a contributing factor in declining frog populations, particularly for species that rely on ephemeral water sources, like some of those in eastern Texas. Scientists in Nacogdoches, TX are currently studying the effects of rainfall and temperature on the breeding activities of 13 different species of frogs in eastern Texas. Information from the research will make it possible to predict potential effects of a changing climate on frog populations.

Geographic Region: 
United States
Southern Region (R8)
Texas
Project Status: 
Action

Conservation of the Louisiana Pine Snake

Contact First Name: 
Daniel
Contact Last Name: 
Saenz
Principal Investigator(s): 
Daniel Saenz
FS Research Station(s): 
Southern Research Station
Summary: 

One of North America’s rarest reptiles, the Louisiana pine snake, may require extra assistance to persist under climate change. Scientists with the Southern Research Station are developing an RRTH (relocation, reintroduction, translocation, headstarting) project for these reptiles.

Geographic Region: 
United States
Southern Region (R8)
Project Status: 
Action

Good news for native trout?

Body
This will give managers an effective tool to help prioritize locations for native brook trout survival.

By Sarah Farmer

It's not always the case that the "further research" scientists call for in their journal articles brings good news, but sometimes collecting more detailed data yields the unexpected. Results from collaborative research by the US Forest Service and the US Geological Survey may not only bring a sigh of relief to native trout lovers but also provide a precise planning tool for land managers in the Appalachian region faced with rising temperatures from climate change.

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