Virgin Islands

Watering the Forests for the Trees: an emerging priority for managing water in forest landscapes

Contact First Name: 
Gordon
Contact Last Name: 
Grant
Principal Investigator(s): 
Gordon Grant, Naomi Tague, Craig Allen
Research Partners: 
UC Santa Barbara, US Geological Survey
FS Research Station(s): 
Pacific Northwest Research Station
Summary: 

Water stress represents a common mechanism for many of the primary disturbances affecting forests, and forest management needs to explicitly address the very large physiological demands that vegetation has for water. This study demonstrates how state-of-science ecohydrologic models can be used to explore how different management strategies might improve forest health.

Project Abstract: 

Widespread threats to forests due to drought stress prompt re-thinking of priorities for water management on forest lands. In contrast to the widely held view that forest management should emphasize providing water for downstream uses, we argue that maintaining forest health in the face of environmental change may require focusing on the forests themselves and strategies to reduce their vulnerability to increasing water stress in the context of a changing climate. Management strategies would need to be tailored to specific landscapes but could include: a) thinning; 2) encouraging drought-tolerant species; 3) irrigation; and 4) strategies that make more water available to plants for transpiration. Hydrologic modeling reveals that specific management actions could reduce tree mortality due to drought stress. Adopting water conservation for vegetation as a priority for managing water on forest lands would represent a fundamental change in perspective and potentially involve tradeoffs with other downstream uses of water.

Research Results: 

Watering the Forests for the Trees: an emerging priority for managing water in forest landscapes - http://www.fsl.orst.edu/wpg/pubs/13_Granteal_WFFT.pdf

Geographic Region: 
United States
Alaska Region (R10)
Northern Region (R1)
Rocky Mountain Region (R2)
Southwestern Region (R3)
Intermountain Region (R4)
Pacific Southwest Region (R5)
Pacific Northwest Region (R6)
Southern Region (R8)
Eastern Region (R9)
Virgin Islands
Project Status: 
Complete
Record Entry Date: 
Tue, 09/23/2014

NASA - CASA Global CQUEST - Carbon Query and Evaluation Support Tools

This application from NASA provides datasets and a viewer for geographic data that support large-scale carbon inventory. The datasets combine NASA remote sensing technology, ecosystem process modeling, and field-based measurements to characterize impacts on the carbon cycle.

NASA cquest map tool
Summary: 

The CASA Global CQUEST application provides datasets and a geographical data viewer that support large-scale carbon inventory. Users can display global data on net primary productivity, net ecosystem productivity, and other variables interactively as a map and obtain data values in tabular format.

Data Basin

Data Basin is a science-based mapping and analysis platform that supports learning, research, and sustainable environmental stewardship. The Climate Center is powered by Data Basin, and centralizes climate change-related datasets, maps and findings. Tools are provided to visualize, analyze, and communicate vulnerabilities, trends or predicted future scenarios at local and regional scales.

Data Basin climate center interface
Summary: 

The Data Basin Climate Center centralizes climate change-related datasets, maps and findings. Tools are provided to visualize, analyze, and communicate vulnerabilities, trends or predicted future scenarios at multiple scales.

SAVS: A System for Assessing Vulnerability of Species to Climate Change

Overview & Applicability

The SAVS uses an online questionnaire with 22 criteria to predict vulnerability or population response of species to provide a framework for assessing vulnerability to future climate change. The 22 multiple-choice questions are grouped into four categories by theme: habitat, physiology, phenology and biotic interactions. The questionnaire is completed using information gathered from published materials, personal knowledge, or expert consultation.

species assessed by SAVS - mountain quail and desert tortoise
Summary: 

SAVS uses an online questionnaire with 22 criteria to predict vulnerability or resilience of an individual species to future climate change. Numerical scores indicating vulnerability or resilience for terrestrial vertebrate species are generated.

MC1 (MAPSS-Century 1)

Overview & Applicability

Assessments of vegetation response to climate change are often made by models that predict vegetation composition under steady-state conditions.

map of vegetation types in North America
Summary: 

MC1 was created to assess the potential impacts of global climate change on ecosystem structure and function. Users can access maps, datasets, and publications that were created using this model.

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