Frequently Asked Questions

  1. How can I reserve a campsite in a campground?
  2. Can I camp outside a developed campground?

  3. How much does a firewood permit cost? Where can I buy a firewood permit?

  4. Do I need to have certified weed-free hay on the National Forest for my horses?

  5. Why are gates locked or roads posted as closed?

     

For recreation information on public lands, try www.recreation.gov.

 

How can I reserve a campsite in a campground?
You can reserve campsite through the National Frecreation Reservation Service either on-line at www.recreation.gov or by telephone at 1-877-444-6777. There is a $9 reservation fee.

 

Can I camp in areas outside of developed campgrounds?
Yes, the Forest Service calls it "dispersed camping." You are allowed to camp almost anywhere in the forest unless it is posted otherwise. But you have a responsibility to leave the area as you found it. Practice No-Trace camping guidelines and you will go a long way towards protecting precious resources.

You may also discover areas that have historically been used as camping areas. These "dispersed camping or undeveloped campgrounds" are campgrounds without any facilities and are generally found along roads, rivers, and some popular trails. Try to refrain from impacting these areas any more than is already done, that is by building additional fire rings, or by leveling more ground for tent spaces. Also, there is no maintenance done on any of these "campgrounds" so please remember: Pack it in, pack it out.

Additionally, in the Boise National Forest you may camp in one area for up to 14 days. After 14 days you must move to a new location at least 5 miles from your previous campsite.

 

How much does a firewood permit cost?
Permits are $12.50 per cord with a 2 cord minimum. (Minimum permit cost is $25.) You can purchase up to 10 cords per household per year.
 

Where can I buy a firewood permit?
Permits can be purchased at any Boise National Forest office and several private vendors.  

 

Do I need to have certified weed-free hay on the National Forest for my horses?
Virtually all National Forests in the Intermountain Region require certified weed free hay. To learn more about the Idaho weed-free program information contact the County Weed Control Superintendent for your county, or visit the Idaho Weed Awareness Website link.

 

Why are gates locked or roads posted as closed?
Land managers use access restrictions, such as total and partial road or trail closures, or seasonal and permanent area closures for a variety of reasons. Such as wildlife protection, water quality and erosion control, public safety, conflict of use, and legal mandates.

While open roads are needed for many types of forest recreation and management, they can cause problems for watershed, fish, and wildlife. By restricting use on some forest roads and trails for all or part of the year, wildlife is less vulnerable, with deer and elk having a greater area to hide. It ensures protection of calving areas, winter range, and migration routes. In turn, this management should provide for continued healthy herds and will prevent overharvesting. Hunters and all other recreationists will benefit along with the wildlife.

Please support travel management. It is a tool that provides more forest benefits with fewer impacts to sensitive forest resources.