Cordova District Fish Program

Cordova Ranger District Fish Program - Fisher person fighting a silver

The boundaries of the Cordova Ranger District contain approximately 2.3 million acres of land and support a diverse assemblage of aquatic habitats ranging from an ever-changing delta wetland to large barrier islands and undulating coastlines. The district contains 809 miles of coho streams, 611 miles of sockeye streams and 450 miles of cutthroat streams. The hundreds of lakes and streams provide habitat for five species of Pacific salmon, cutthroat trout, Dolly Varden, whitefish, and other fish species.

The Copper River Delta is woven from six glacial river systems and is the largest contiguous wetland on the Pacific Coast.

Prince William Sound was formed by millions of years of glaciations causing its shorelines to be heavily indented with deep fjords and many small bays. The Sound offers a variety of fishing opportunities from pristine mountain fed streams to saltwater fishing in a remote bay. Whether fishing on the Delta or in the Sound, the Cordova Ranger District provides fishing opportunities for everyone.

The purpose of the District Fisheries Program is to manage and protect the aquatic habitat and ecosystem so that the resources continue to be available for all users: the commercial fishers, subsistence users, sport anglers, fish watchers, and all of the others that benefit from healthy watersheds.

This website will tell you about some of the work the fish crew does, the research that fish scientists from across the country are doing on the District, and, last but not least, what kinds of fish we have here and where to go fishing!

 

Salmon Smolt