Special Forest Products-Berries

 

Commercial Permit

No Permit Required

A close up photograph of hand picking huckleberries.

No Permit Required

Berries may be consumed while visiting the Gifford Pinchot National Forest.

A person may pick up to three gallons of berries in a year without a permit. But these berries may not be sold or bartered. If you wish to sell berries you need a Commercial Permit.

There are no designated seasons for the personal use berry harvest.

An area in the Sawtooth Berry Fields was reserved in 1932 by a handshake agreement between Yakama Indian Chief William Yallup and Gifford Pinchot National Forest Supervisor J.R. Bruckart for use by Indians. By understanding the historical significance of this area, we hope you pay close attention to the signs indicating the areas reserved for use by the Indians. By doing so, you are respecting the culture of another people.

Photograph of huckleberry handshake agreement interpretive sign with Mt. Adams in the background.

The Huckleberry Handshake agreement

interpretive site near Surprise Lakes.

Removal of berries is also prohibited from Wilderness areas, the legislated Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument, Experimental Forest, Research Natural Areas or other areas that are administratively closed.  A Special Forest Products Harvest Area map is available at the Ranger District offices. This map displays the areas where you may harvest berries.

A Recreation page contains more information on huckleberries.

 

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Commercial Permit

A photograph of a commercial huckleberry processing facility.

How many berries can I harvest? 

The limits on the amount of berries that you may harvest are displayed in the Commercial Permit Product Summary Table.
 

How much does a permit cost?

The cost a permit to harvest berries is shown in the Commercial Permit Product Summary Table.
 

Where can I harvest berries?


The commercial gathering of berries is prohibited in some areas under a "Handshake Agreement" with the Indian Tribes, check with the local district for these locations. An area in the Sawtooth Berry Fields was reserved in 1932 by a handshake agreement between Yakama Indian Chief William Yallup and Gifford Pinchot National Forest Supervisor J.R. Bruckart for use by Indians. By understanding the historical significance of this area, we hope you pay close attention to the signs indicating the areas reserved for use by the Indians. By doing so, you are respecting the culture of another people.
 

Commercial harvest of berries is also prohibited in Wilderness areas, the legislated Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument, Experimental Forest, Research Natural Areas or other areas that are administratively closed.

When can I gather berries?

There is a set season for the commercial harvest of huckleberries. The season for the commercial harvest of Huckleberries begins on the second Monday in August check with the local Ranger District office for other information on the Huckleberry season.

A Special Forest Products Harvest Area map is available at the Ranger District offices. This map displays the areas where you may harvest berries.

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