Christmas Trees

Forest Christmas Tree, web image.

Picking the right Christmas tree can be difficult. Learn how to plan, find, cut and keep your tree fresh for the holiday. 

  

 

 

 

Christmas Tree permits available at theses locations:

 

Mt. Baker Ranger Station

810 State Route 20 Sedro-Woolley, WA

360-856-5700 Ext. 515 

Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.- 4:30 p.m. 
Nov. 29, 9 a.m.- 3 p.m.
Dec. 6, 9 a.m.- 3 p.m.
Dec. 13, 9 a.m.- 3 p.m

Verlot Public Service Center

33515 Mountain Loop Highway, Granite Falls, WA 

360-691-7791 

Nov. 28-30, 9 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.

Dec.6-7, 9 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.

Dec. 13-14, 9 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.

Enumclaw Office

450 Roosevelt Ave. E. Enumclaw, WA

360-825-6585 

Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.- 4:30 p.m.
Nov. 29-30, 8 a.m.- 3:30 p.m.
Dec. 6-7, 8 a.m.- 3:30 p.m.
Dec. 13-14, 8 a.m.- 3:30 p.m. 

Glacier Public Service Center

Mt. Baker Highway 542 Glacier, WA

360-599-2714

Weekends, 9 a.m.- 3 p.m.

Starting Nov. 22

Skykomish Ranger Station

74920 NE Stevens Pass Hwy, 

Skykomish, WA

360-677-2414  

Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.- 4:30 p.m.
Nov. 29, 8 a.m.- 3:00 p.m.
Dec. 6, 8 a.m.- 3:00 p.m.

Seattle REI

Outdoor Recreation Information Center

222 Yale Ave. N.  Seattle, WA

206-470-4060  

Daily 10 a.m.- 6 p.m.

Closed Thanksgiving

Darrington Ranger Station

1405 Emens Ave. N. Darrington, WA

360-436-1155  

Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.- 4:30 p.m. 
Nov. 29, 9 a.m.- 3 p.m.
Dec. 6, 9 a.m.- 3 p.m.
Dec. 13, 9 a.m.- 3 p.m.  

Snoqualmie Ranger Stations 

902 SE North Bend Way North Bend, WA

425-888-1421   

Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.- 4:30 p.m.
Nov. 29, 8 a.m.- 3:30 p.m.
Dec. 6, 8 a.m.- 3:30 p.m.
Dec. 13, 8 a.m.- 3:30 p.m.

REI Alderwood Store

3000 184th St. SW  Lynnwood, WA

425-640-6200  

Mon.-Sat. 10 a.m.- 9 p.m.
Sun. 11 a.m.-7 p.m.

Closed Thanksgiving

 

Locations by corridor

 

Other You-Cut loccations:

 

Seven steps to keeping your tree fresh
Courtesy of Bill Thorness, Seattle Times

Talk about a Big Gulp – the convenience store has nothing on your Christmas tree, which will suck up water like a big straw after you separate it from Mother Earth.

“You are keeping it alive,” explains Renee Brooks, a research tree physiologist in Corvallis, Ore. Water is pulled through the “tracheids” in the trunk—a series of tubes formed by the dead wood cells. That feeds the needles, keeping the outer ones supple and attached. But once those tracheids dry out or get clogged with sap, the tree will no longer draw water.

Her basic advice: “Cut the bottom off when you get it home and leave it in a reservoir of water for 24 hours to keep it at its freshest.” Use a big bucket—it will drink heavily.

“If you cut down your own tree, you can easily keep it from Thanksgiving on,” she says. “A properly tended tree could be safe until New Year’s.”

Her tips on keeping your tree fresh:

  1. Cut the bottom when you get it home
  2. Plunge it immediately into a large bucket of water
  3. Leave it outside for 24 hours
  4. Use a tree stand that holds at least a gallon of water
  5. Get it in the stand with water within a half-hour of bringing it in the house
  6. Don’t place the tree near a fireplace, and close any heating vents near the tree
  7. Check and fill the water every day