Maps & Publications

Motor Vehicle Use Maps (Summer Travel)

The Forest Service is committed to making its documents accessible to individuals with disabilities in accordance with Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act (29 U.S.C. 794d), as amended in 1998. Not all features of Motor Vehicle Use Maps are accessible in electronic format. Please contact our office at 406-791-7700 (TTY 406-731-5331) to be sent a hard copy of this map. 

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New, effective Sept. 1, 2013:  Letter of Clarification that allows for Wheeled Off-Highway Vehicles less than or equal to 50-inches Width on trails previously designated on the Motor Vehicle Use Map as being for ATV and motorcycle only, on the Jefferson Division. This allows wheeled OHVs that meet the 50" width limitations (often known as side-by-sides) to travel on trails identified on the Motor Vehicle Use Map as open to ATV and Motorcycle.  UTV's wider than 50-inches are still prohibited on ATV trails.  This change does not impact the Rocky Mountain Ranger District.

Little Belt Mountains 2013 (.pdf, 4.6 mb) - January 31, 2013, rev. 2, 5/31/2013 - updated access status in Carpenter Creek and land ownership in the Tenderfoot. 
 - Log of changes to the Little Belt Mtns MVUM (.pdf, 80 kb) - Jan. 31, 2013
Castle Mountains, 2014 (.pdf. 2.9 mb) - January 31, 2014
Crazy Mountains, 2013 (.pdf, 1 mb) - January 31, 2013 
Big and Little Snowy Mountains, 2013 (.pdf, 1 mb) - January 31, 2013 
Highwood Mountains, 2013 (.pdf, 1 mb) - January 31, 2013 
Rocky Mountain Ranger District, 2014 (.pdf, 2 mb)- January 31, 2014 
Lewis and Clark Interpretive Center, 2013 (.pdf, 192 kb) - January 31, 2013 

History

In 2008, The Lewis and Clark National Forest published a Motor Vehicle Use Map for all of its lands as per the Travel Management Final Rule (36 CFR 261.2).

The MVUM displays Forest roads and trails open to motor vehicles and when they are open. If a route is not shown on the MVUM, it is not open to public motor vehicle travel. Some routes may not be signed on the ground, and it is the user's responsibility to refer to the MVUM and ensure they are on an open route. The MVUM will be updated to reflect any changes in route status, and to correct errors. Special orders may be issued at any time that temporarily close routes for reasons such as safety concerns, resource damage, or fire. The MVUM is best used with a more detailed map, for sale at the National Forest Store or USGS.

Travel Management

The Forest Service announced new travel regulations on November 2, 2005, governing motor vehicle use on national forests and grasslands. The new rule requires each National Forest or ranger district to designate those roads, trails, and areas open to motor vehicle use.

Motor Vehicles are defined as any vehicle which is self-propelled, other than a wheelchair or mobility device as defined in 36 CFR 261.2, including highway legal and non-highway legal terra vehicles. This definition excludes aircraft, watercraft, and over snow vehicles according to 36 CFR 212.51

In 2008, The Lewis and Clark National Forest published a Motor Vehicle Use Map for all of its lands, including the Rocky Mountain and Jefferson Divisions, as well as the Lewis and Clark National Forest Interpretive Center.

These maps reflect the 2007 Travel Plan decision for the Little Belt, Castle, and Crazy Mountains, and the 2007 Travel Plan decision for the Rocky Mountain Ranger District Birch Creek South, as well as previous decisions for the Highwood Mountains, Big Snowy Mountains, Little Snowy Mountains, and Badger-Two Medicine Area of the Rocky Mountain Ranger District.

Some decisions in the 2007 Travel Plans will not be implemented until certain requirements or projects have been completed. For example, roads identified in the travel plan as mixed-use routes are not yet open to mixed-use. Completion of a "motorized mixed-use analysis" which is currently underway will be reflected on future Motor Vehicle Use Maps. Motorized mixed use is a designation of a National Forest System Road which means that the road can be used by both highway-legal and non-highway-legal motor vehicles, as per state law. In the motorized mixed-use analysis, a qualified engineer will consider mitigation of observed safety risks through such measures as signs, speed controls, user education, modifications to road geometry, regulating the timing of commercial hauling, or other safety measures.

More about the Motor Vehicle Use Map

The Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) is a requirement of the Travel Management Final Rule. The MVUM displays those National Forest System roads, trails, and areas (if any) that are designated open to motor vehicles, by vehicle class (highway-legal vehicles, high-clearance vehicles, ATVs, and motorcycles), and any seasonal or time allowances. The MVUM also provides information on other travel rules and regulations. If a route is not shown on the MVUM, it is not open to public motor vehicle travel. Every reasonable attempt has been made to mark routes designated for motor vehicle use with route marker signs (showing the route number). However, some routes may not always be signed on the ground. It will be the public's responsibility to refer to the MVUM to determine designated routes for motor vehicle use. The MVUM will be updated annually to correct mapping errors or discrepancies, and to reflect any changes in route status.

Special orders may be issued at any time during the year to temporarily close certain routes for reasons such as safety concerns, resource damage, or due to fire or other emergency activity. These routes will be appropriately marked on the ground.

The MVUM is a black and white map with few topographic features. It is best used in conjunction with a Forest Visitor Map or other topographic map. The MVUM is free to the public at each local Ranger District office. Forest Visitor Maps are available at Forest Service offices, or through the National Forest Store on the web.

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