The Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit is located in the east central part of California.
Where is this Forest?

 

Welcome to the Lake Tahoe Basin Mgmt Unit!

[Graphic]: Depicts the location of the Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit in the state of California.Over 78% of the area around the lake is public land managed by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service.  Totaling over 150,000 acres, this land includes beaches, hiking and biking trails, wilderness, historic estates and developed recreation areas such as campgrounds and riding stables.  The forest is managed to provide access for the public and to protect the natural resources of the area.  We hope you will join us in ensuring that the lake and surrounding lands Read More

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Features

2015 Off-Highway Vehicle Grant

Color photo of a jeep climbing a steep rock hill

The Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit is submitting an application to the Off-Highway Motor Vehicle Recreation Division (OHMVR) of the California State Parks for grants to provide financial assistance to the Forest Service for Ground Operations Management and Maintenance of OHV trails and trailheads on the Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit. Visit www.ohv.parks.ca.gov to learn more.


Cold water can be used as a climate shield to protect native aquatic species

Maps showing the study area and locations of stream temperature data.

A new study by researchers at the U.S. Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station published in Global Change Biology shows that high-resolution stream temperature scenarios can be used to forecast which streams will serve as climate refuges for native cutthroat and bull trout later this century and that many streams are forecast to be too cold to be invaded by non-native species. Follow the link above to read more.


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Spotlights

International Day of the Forest

Tree planting in Kfardebian, Mount Lebanon.

The International Day of Forests highlights Forest Service involvement with international partners to protect the health of forests worldwide. Follow the link above to read more.

The Power of One Tree

The Ponderosa Pine can grow to heights of over 200 feet.

The Forest Service would like folks to ask themselves: Do I really know how much trees contribute to my daily life? Follow the link above to find out. 

 




Federal Workers Volunteer for the ‘Toughest 300 Miles in Dog Racing’

Musher Heidi Sutter and dog sled team approach the Sourdough checkpoint.

Think Alaska in the winter: a large land canvas of powdery, granular or icy snow and days of often very, very cold weather. Follow the link above to read more.

Can your ashes campaign!

A small metal trash can with a lid.

Fireplace or woodstove embers can remain hot enough to kindle a fire for days. To learn how to properly dispose of fireplace, wood stove or barbecue ashes, visit the link above.  



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