The Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit is located in the east central part of California.
Where is this Forest?

 

Learning Center

The Learning Center contains educational information about the Lake Tahoe Basin. Learn how the basin was formed, who the first inhabitants of the basin were, important backcountry safety tips, how to attend the Winter Trek Environmental Education program and read the Big Tree Register, which documents the largest trees found in the basin. Follow the links below to learn more about these interesting topics.

 

Nature & Science

2011 LTBMU Big Tree Register

This publication documents the largest known trees growing within the Lake Tahoe Basin.   

Birds of the Lake Tahoe Basin

Learn about the many bird species in the Lake Tahoe Basin that are often seen by residents and visitors.

Guidelines for Living In and Visiting Bear and Mountain Lion Habitat

People and bears occupy much of the same geographical areas in California. Residents and visitors are reminded to act responsibly when living in or visiting bear country. Generally speaking, mountain lions can be found wherever deer are present. For more information and safety tips, follow the link listed above.

An Ecosystem in Transition

Lake Tahoe is a complex and fragile environment, not easily described, nor easily managed. The many elements of this ecosystem, people, wildlife, trees and other plants, water, soil and insects, all must find a way to comfortably coexist. 

Lands in Transition

Lands in Transition presents a series of questions and feedback that lead you into the role of Forest Manager; a position entrusted with the stewardship of the forests.  With the help of experts in the field, you will make hard decisions that try to balance the interest of the public and the health of the environment.  

Geology of the Lake Tahoe Basin

Although it is commonly believed that Lake Tahoe was formed by the collapse of a volcanic crater, the Basin was actually formed by the rise and fall of the landscape due to faulting.  

Trees in Transition

During the Comstock Era, hundreds of thousands of huge, old trees were cut down, hauled to the lake, and floated to lumber mills at Glenbrook and Incline Village.  By 1881 more than two billion board-feet of lumber had been removed from the Lake Tahoe area. Learn how this impacted today's forests.

 

History & Culture

History Told on Trees: The Basque Shepherds

Discoveries of gold, silver in California and Nevada attracted immigrants from around the world. Basque people from Spain and France were among these new arrivals, contributing their language, culture and expertise to the patchwork culture and society of the Lake Tahoe Basin.

In the Forest of Gold Mountain: The Chinese Experience at Tahoe

Just as discoveries of gold, silver and other abundant resources attracted the Basque people from Spain and France, Chinese people mainly from southwestern provinces of China, joined these new arrivals in the Lake Tahoe Basin.  

The Washoe - First People of the Lake

Lake Tahoe and approximately 10,000 square miles of land surrounding the lake were once home to the Washoe Tribe. Learn more about these first inhabitants of the Lake Tahoe Basin.                    

 

Outdoor Safety & Ethics

Avoid Avalanche Hazards

Avalanche awareness during the winter months in the Lake Tahoe Basin is vital to those who venture out into the back country. Educate yourself in order to ensure you and your companions have a safe and enjoyable outing.

Back Country Safety Tips

The back country is beautiful, but can also be unforgiving. Advance preparation is essential to an enjoyable, safe trip.   

Camping Safety and Tips

Whether you're roughing it in a tent at a campground or in the back country, there are many ways to make sure your trip is fun and safe. 

Hypothermia

As many as 85 percent of outdoor recreation fatalities are caused by hypothermia.  Learn what you can do to minimize the risks.

Guidelines for Living In and Visiting Bear and Mountain Lion Habitat

People and bears occupy much of the same geographical areas in California. Residents and visitors are reminded to act responsibly when living in or visiting bear country. Generally speaking, mountain lions can be found wherever deer are present. For more information and safety tips, follow the link listed above.

Lightning Safety

Many vacationers are unaware of the measures they can take to lower their risk of being struck by lightning. Educating yourself about lightning strikes can minimize the risk.

Trail Tips for Hikers and Backpackers

The Lake Tahoe Basin offers some of the most spectacular hiking and backpacking in the nation. Whether you are going out for a day hike or an extended backpacking trip follow these safety tips to ensure a safe and enjoyable experience.

 

Just for Kids/Parents & Teachers

Fall Fish Fest

The Fall Fish Festival (formerly the Kokanee Salmon Festival) is planned as a family event encouraging participation by children and their parents in a wide variety of free educational and entertaining events. The celebration includes food, trail runs, booths and activities for kids.

Generation Green

Many children in the Lake Tahoe area are disconnected with the outdoor environment.  The Generation Green of Lake Tahoe is a work program designed to teach students about the forest while they work. 

Lake Tahoe Bird Festival

The annual Lake Tahoe Bird Festival is a collaboration with the U.S. Forest Service and the Tahoe Institute for Natural Science in June. Residents and visitors are invited to attend this free family event which includes guided bird walks, information on migratory birds, activities for kids and much more.

Winter Trek Express

The Winter Trek Express is a collaboration of the U.S. Forest Service, Heavenly Mountain Resort, the City of South Lake Tahoe and the Tahoe Heritage Foundation. This fifth-grade outdoor education program typically begins in January and runs through March, weather permitting.