Working Together

Hemlock Dam Removal on the Gifford Pinchot National Forest to restore aquatic habitat was the result of multiple partnerships in the region.The US Forest Service works in partnership with public agencies, private organizations, tribes, watershed groups, volunteer organizations, nonprofit organizations, schools, and individuals to manage national forest resources. These include water, fish, trees, soil, recreation facilities, roads, terrestrial habitats, invasive weeds, and more!

Multiple and dynamic partnerships between the Forest Service and other entities come in the form of agreements, grants, contracts, and volunteer commitments for specific projects or tasks needed to keep our forest healthy and active.

Advisory Committees

  • Information on citizen advisory committees and the Federal Advisory Committee Act is available.

Contracting

Grants and Agreements

  •  Find information on how to apply for assistance through grants or cooperative agreements with the Forest Service.

Asset Management


Partnerships

  • The Forest Service is working hard to support an integrated, strategic, and above all, person-to-person approach to developing and maintaining partnerships of all sorts, for mutual benefits both short and long term.

Tribal Relations

  • The Forest Service is committed to working and enhancing tribal relations.

Volunteering 

  • Volunteering is an excellent way to learn new skills, meet new people, create opportunities, and help your communities.

Spotlights

Partnerships in the Sandy River Basin

The Sandy River Basin Agreement Partnership formed in 1999 for habitat restoration to benefit the recovery of listed fish. 

Partnerships for Youth Opportunities

Partnership for Youth Opportunities on the Gifford Pinchot National Forest.

 




Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Program

Deschutes Skyline Project: located on 97,000 acres in the Deschutes NF, the goal of this project is to restore forest ecosystems to be resilient to natural processes.