Ancient Bristlecone Pine Forest Visitor Center

Area Status: Closed
This area is Closed
 

The visitor center includes interpretive programs, maps and book sales.

History of construction of the visitor center, click here.

At a Glance

Current Conditions: White Mountain Road is snow covered. Bring snowshoes and microspikes for the hike to the visitor center. 12/30/2015- The road is closed at the Sierra View Overlook, approximately 2.5 miles from the Schulman Grove. Snow and ice cover the road before Grandview. Be prepared with chains and 4WD. link to weather forecast
Operational Hours: Visitor center is closed for the winter.
Fees Day Use fee is $3.00 per person to a maximum of $6.00 per car. Children under 18 free, America the Beautiful and Golden Age passes are accepted.
Usage: Light
Busiest Season: July-August
Restrictions:
  • Campfires and overnight camping not allowed.
  • Dogs are allowed on leash.
  • Stay on trails to prevent damage to the ancient trees and their seedlings.
  • Vehcile use is restricted to established, maintained roads.  No off-road travel is permitted.
Closest Towns: Nearest fuel, food and water are in Big Pine (22 miles). Full service in Bishop (38 miles)
Water: None
Restroom: Vault Toilet (1)
Operated By: Forest Service

General Information

Directions:

From Big Pine travel east on Highway 168 for 13 miles. Turn left at the signed junction for White Mountain Road to the Bristlecone Pine Forest and continue 10 miles until the end of the paved road at Schulman Grove. Turn right into the visitor center parking lot.


Activities


Hiking

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Day Hiking

Three trails depart and loop back to the Schulman Grove Visitor Center.  The Discovery Trail is approximately 1 mile and features interpretive signs and rest benches along the trail.

The trail to the Mexican Mine is approximately 2.5 miles and offers views of the old miners cabins and the entrance to the mines as well as many photogenic Bristlecone Pine trees.

The Methusula Trail is 5 miles and gains approximately 700 feet of elevation.  There are numbered posts along the trail and a brochure is available at the start of the trail.  The world's oldest living tree is along this trail and although it's identity is kept a secret, you may feel certain at the end of the hike that you have seen the oldest tree known to exist.


Nature Viewing

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Outdoor Learning

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Picnicking

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