Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness

  

Looking down a picturesque creek

The Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness lies within the boundaries of four national forests and seven ranger districts. Its rugged peaks and connection to four national forests make this a popular destination for people looking to spend time in the wild. Find out more about this and other wildernesses at Wilderness.net

At a Glance

Restrictions: This is rugged wild country with no cell phone service. There is a 14-day limit on camping or storing equipment and supplies at a site. A site is defined as any location and the surrounding five mile area. Travel is permitted only by foot or by stock. Group size is restricted to 20 people and 20 head of stock. Use of wheeled vehicles and motorized equipment is prohibited.The Magruder Corridor, a primitive one-lane road is rough, steep and winding, with few turnouts for passing oncoming vehicles. It is suitable for high clearance vehicles, pickup trucks, motorcycles and mountain bikes. Towing trailers is not recommended because of several hairpin turns along the route. Motorhomes with low clearance are not recommended.
Closest Towns: Grangeville, Idaho and Darby, Montana

General Information

Directions:

From Grangeville, Idaho travel east on State Highway 14 to the junction with Forest Road (FR) 222. Follow FR 222 to the junction of FR 468, Magruder Corridor (65 miles east of Grangeville). The Magruder Corridor was created in 1980, leaving a unique road that enables a traveler to drive between two wildernesses; the 1.2 million-acre Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness to the north, and the 2.3-million-acre Frank Church-River of No Return Wilderness to the south. The east end of the Magruder Corridor is 0.8 miles south of West Fork Ranger Station (18 miles southwest of Darby, Montana). The wilderness can also be accessed from in Idaho from FR 223, Selway River Road; Wilderness Gateway Campground on State Highway 12; and FR 360, Elk Summit. Access points in Montana are Lost Horse and Lake Como.


General Notes:

Elevations range from 1800 feet on the Selway and Lochsa Rivers to 10,000 feet in the Bitterroot Mountains. Many long ranges at 5000 and 6000 feet with steep slopes. All streams drain into the Selway, Lochsa, or Bitterroot rivers. The Selway-Bitterroot is administered through management direction outlined in the Selway-Bitterroot General Management Direction, last updated in 1996.


Activities