Resource Management

When the USDA Forest Service was created, there were about 760 million acres of national forest land. Today, there are nearly 750 million acres of national forest land. Sustaining the national forests during the last century while the country’s population grew by nearly 300 percent is a conservation success story.

The Forest Service celebrated its Centennial Anniversary on July 1, 2005. In the late 1890s Congress set aside selected forests and grasslands for the protection of watersheds for communities, and so that the land would be managed in perpetuity for multiple uses. In July 1905 President Theodore Roosevelt transferred the care of those forests and grasslands to the U.S. Department of Agriculture Bureau of Forestry, later renamed the Forest Service.

Since its beginning 100 years ago, the mission of the Forest Service has been tied to the relationship that Americans have with the land. It’s a relationship founded on the premise that natural resources may be used wisely while sustaining them for generations to come. In all endeavors, today’s Forest Service remains grounded in the firm belief that the outcome must serve “the greatest good of the greatest number in the long run.”

Secure Rural Schools

A Secure Rural Schools Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) has been established for the Dixie National Forest. RACs develop, approve, and monitor land management projects on forest lands. For more information see the news release or go to www.fs.fed.us/srs.

Land and Resource Management Plans

Land and Resource Management Plan for the Dixie National Forest (Document signed in 1986)

Ecosystem Management

In the late 1890s Congress set aside selected forests and grasslands for the protection of watersheds for communities, and so that the land would be managed in perpetuity for multiple uses.  The Forest Service strives to protect the ecosystems under its management to reclaim, sustain, or enhance the health of the ecosystem as a whole.  This not only benefits watersheds, but range lands, timber resoruces, recreational opportunities and other aspects of ecosystems.

Escalante Headwaters Landscape Restoration Strategy

Fire and Resource Management

Wildlife Habitat Created Through Fire

Rangeland Management/Grazing

The Forest Service has undergone many changes in its management of rangelands. In the early 1800s, free forage on unclaimed public domain lands allowed the building of cattle and sheep empires.  Read more...

Timber Management

Have you seen the dead forest on Cedar Mountain or read articles about it in the newspapers? What’s causing it? How long will it last? The Dixie National Forest provides the following information on the spruce beetle epidemic to answer your questions. Read more...

How can we purchase seedlings for planting native trees from the Dixie forest.

If you are interested in seedlings, you need to get in touch with the State Forester office. The telephone number is 435-586-4408. You can get a permit from the Forest Service to dig up a tree to transplant. They cannot be taller than 6' and cost $5 each. There is a $20 minimum permit. These permits may be obtained at any District Office.