The Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit is located in the east central part of California.
Where is this Forest?

 

Welcome to the Lake Tahoe Basin Mgmt Unit!

[Graphic]: Depicts the location of the Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit in the state of California.Over 78% of the area around the lake is public land managed by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service.  Totaling over 150,000 acres, this land includes beaches, hiking and biking trails, wilderness, historic estates and developed recreation areas such as campgrounds and riding stables.  The forest is managed to provide access for the public and to protect the natural resources of the area.  We hope you will join us in ensuring that the lake and surrounding lands Read More

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Recent News


Features

Skyrocketing Fire Costs

Spiraling firefighting costs have shrunk the budget for critical forest and rangeland priorities.

Over the past twenty years, a changing climate, population growth near forests and rangelands, and the buildup of brush and other fuels have dramatically increased the severity of wildfires and the damage that they cause to our natural lands and communities. Year after year, fire seasons grow longer and longer, destroying homes, threatening critical infrastructure and the watersheds that provide clean drinking water to millions of people. Between 1980 and 2011, the average annual number of fires on Federal land more than doubled, and the total area burned annually tripled. Even as fire seasons have grown, the way we pay to fight these fires remains unchanged – and fundamentally broken. Follow the link above to read more.


U.S. Forest Service: responding and adapting to wildland fire

The Forest Service has burned more than 480 acres in the Flying J Project in Arizona.

The loss of property and firefighters during wildfires are a reminder of the challenges we face in reducing the risks associated with large, unpredictable wildfires. Climate change, drought, insect infestations, changing land-use patterns, and other factors have contributed to increases in the complexity and in the numbers of wildfires across the United States. Visit http://www.fs.fed.us/news/2014/stories/04/responding-wildland-fire.shtml to read more.


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Spotlights

Faces of the Forest

Jennifer Barnhart works for the Andrew Pickens Ranger District on the Sumter National Forest.

Jennifer currently works for Andrew Pickens Ranger District on the Sumter National Forest. She is a fairly new employee of the Forest Service. Visit the link above to read more.

Inner city youth protect an ancient Oregon forest wilderness

Students from the Inner City Youth Institute worked in Drift Creek Wilderness.

Inner city youth helped protect an ancient forest wilderness in the Siuslaw National Forest by spending a day removing invasive tansy ragwort. Visit the link above to read more.

 




Forest Service underwater salmon cam ready to school viewers

A male sockeye swims in Alaska’s Steep Creek on the Tongass National Forest.

The Forest Service is streaming from the bed of Juneau's Steep Creek on the Tongass National Forest in Alaska. Visit the link above for live video.

Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit Follw-Up Objector Meeting

Covers for the Land Management Plan (Forest Plan)

To read the agenda and objection issue summaries for the July 1, 2014 follow-up meeting, visit the link above.



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Fire Danger Level: Moderate