Last of logging trucks drive through Bogus Basin lodge area after hazardous trees removed prior to ski season, video and interview for media

Contact(s): Robbie Johnson, PIO with the Idaho Department of Lands, at 208-908-1786


(Boise) – Diseased and infested trees that were a hazard to those who ski and recreate at Bogus Basin Mountain Recreation Area have been removed. The treated area covers approximately 200 acres. This Good Neighbor Authority project was made possible by a timber sale administered by the Idaho Department of Lands (IDL) as part of the U.S. Forest Service (Forest Service) Bogus Basin Forest Health Project. 

 

Work immediately around the ski area is done for the year, but the project is not complete. The overall health project will take several years to be finished. The most critical safety areas were addressed first.  Those recreating at Bogus should already notice the missing hazardous trees around the ski runs on the front side of the ski area and around the Superior chairlift.

 

Video is available from today showing one of the logging trucks leaving Bogus Basin, as they drive through the base of the ski hill. There are also pictures, and an interview with George Nuesse, Idaho Department of Lands Good Neighbor Authority Program Specialist about the things people will notice as a result of the project.

 

If you have any questions, please contact Robbie Johnson, PIO with the Idaho Department of Lands, at 208-908-1786.

 

Additional background from August 2019 news release: According to the Forest Service, almost 80 percent of the tree stands within the Bogus Basin project area are infected with Douglas-fir dwarf mistletoe. The mistletoe is found under the bark of trees and grows into dense clumps of branches called “brooms.” The mistletoe deprives trees of water and nutrients, weakening them and making them susceptible to Douglas-fir beetles and western bark beetles, which can kill the trees.

 

These trees present a safety hazard as the large “brooms” may fall, especially under the weight of heavy snow. There are also dead and dying trees that need to be addressed. Most of the trees that need removal are located on ski slopes, around ski lifts, and along groomed cross-country ski, mountain bike, and hiking trails. A total of 1,050 acres was identified as needing tree removal at Bogus Basin, and will be harvested through several timber sales. The most critical safety areas were addressed first. 

 

On August 5, Sims Wood Inc. entered into an agreement to harvest the first 133 acres of damaged trees on the Boise National Forest through a state timber sale contract. The wood was sold as firewood and saw logs. This sale was made possible because of the Good Neighbor Authority (GNA). GNA is a federal law that enables the Forest Service to partner with the IDL to achieve restoration and resilient landscape objectives across ownership boundaries in Idaho. 

 

After the tree harvest, a diversity of tree species will be planted to improve forest resilience to uncharacteristic insect, disease and wildland fire disturbance, making the area a safer forest for recreation.

 

“This is the second GNA project that we have partnered with IDL on the Boise National Forest,” said Cecilia Seesholtz, Boise National Forest Supervisor. “This partnership allows both agencies to meet common goals in restoring landscapes.”

 

“The Good Neighbor Authority is an important tool, in this situation it allows the Forest Service and the IDL to partner together to take care of significant forest health issues that create potential public safety problems,” IDL Director Dustin Miller said. “The improved forest health will make a difference for those who enjoy this popular recreation area.” 

 

“Bogus Basin supports these essential efforts to improve the health of our forests for the enjoyment of future generations,” said Brad Wilson, General Manager of Bogus Basin. “We appreciate the opportunity to participate in the collaborative Forest Health Project initiative.”

 

The Bogus Basin Forest Health Project was developed in collaboration with the Boise Forest Coalition. 

 

GNA PROGRESS IN IDAHO

Revenues generated from GNA sales offset state costs for projects like the one at Bogus Basin. This timber sale and other planned GNA projects elsewhere in Idaho are the result of three years of work between the State of Idaho, Forest Service, timber companies, forest partners, and local communities. (Boise) – About 200 acres of diseased and infested trees that were a hazard to those who ski and recreate at Bogus Basin Mountain Recreation Area have been removed. This was made possible by a timber sale administered by the Idaho Department of Lands (IDL) as part of the U.S. Forest Service (Forest Service) Bogus Basin Forest Health Project. 

 

 

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https://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/boise/news-events/?cid=FSEPRD682786