Fauna - Threatened, Endangered, and Species of Conservation Concern

Español

Banner Fauna Conserv Concern

 

This section covers federally threatened and endangered (T&E) species and any applicable candidate and proposed species, which require protection or consultation under the Endangered Species Act (36 CFR 219.16). The Forest Service cooperates with the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) in the identification and evaluation of species likely to be affected and in the development of Forest plan components that contribute to their recovery.

For specific reference to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918, there are two species from the 2008 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Migratory Bird list for the U.S. Caribbean islands (Puerto Rico and U.S. Virgin Islands).  The two species are the Elfin-woods warbler (Setophaga angelae) and the Greater Antillean Oriole or the updated name, the Puerto Rican Oriole (Icterus portoricensis).  The two species are addressed through at-risk fauna species sections due to the status of the Elfin-woods warbler as a Federally-listed species and the Puerto Rican Oriole as a Species of Conservation Concern.  Thus, habitat issues are addressed for this Act in the new Forest Plan for El Yunque National Forest.  For more information refer to the Final Environmental Impact Statement.

 

Threatened and Endangered Species

Species of Conservation Concern

Threatened and Endangered Species

Throughout El Yunque, T&E species protection and habitat enhancement is a priority, so their needs are particularly emphasized.  For some species such as the Puerto Rican parrot and elfin woods warbler, the Forest Service consistently works beyond the plan area boundary to collaborate and cooperate with U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and other partners to support an “all-lands” approach to species recovery. The agency has also worked and continues to work with partners to reintroduce at-risk species into historical habitat on National Forest System lands where appropriate.

 List of federally listed threatened and endangered and candidate (T&E) species (fauna) on El Yunque:

Common Name Scientific Name Category Status
Puerto Rican Parrot Amazona vittata Bird Endangered
Puerto Rican Broad-winged Hawk Buteo platypterus brunnescens Bird Endangered
Puerto Rican Sharp-shinned Hawk Accipiter striatus venator Bird Endangered
Elfin Woods Warbler Setophaga angelae Bird Threatened
Puerto Rican Boa Epicratus inornatus Reptile Endangered
White-necked Crow Corvus leucognaphalus Bird Extirpated from Puerto Rico

 

Puerto Rican Parrot (Amazona vittata): EndangeredPhoto of Puerto Rican Parrot

Once widespread throughout the island, the Puerto Rican parrot was reduced to a relict population on El Yunque National Forest, one of few forested areas left on the island by the late 1930s (Brash 1987, Snyder et al. 1987).  The Puerto Rican parrot was listed as endangered in 1968. This species is the only native parrot in the United States and it was considered one of the ten most endangered birds in the world. Nearly every aspect of the species’ life cycle, including most biotic interactions (e.g., predators, ectoparasites), have been managed to promote its persistence (USFWS 2009). The bird is not directly associated to a specific habitat on the EYNF but “Amazona parrots in general are known to range widely within the forest types they inhabit, regularly flying long distances to obtain food” (Snyder et al. 1987). 

Before the 2017 hurricanes there were 53 to 56 wild individuals in EYNF and 134 wild individuals in the Río Abajo Forest in north central Puerto Rico.  After hurricanes Irma and María, the number of known alive wild individuals reduced to 3 to 11 and 104 respectively.  Two combined captive population aviaries hold more than 350 individuals: the Iguaca Aviary and the José L. Vivaldi Aviary in EYNF and Rio Abajo state forest, respectively.  The species was at 13 individuals in 1976 and a total population, including captive birds, at approximately 500 individuals before the 2017 hurricanes (Velez 2016). According to a population viability analysis (2003) the Puerto Rican parrot is still slowly coming out of a genetic bottleneck. Interagency efforts have been addressing population growth limitations to move towards a viable status for the parrot.  The interagency recovery effort has also realized that EYNF is not the optimal habitat for the Puerto Rican parrot. A more successful population may be established by introducing a third wild flock in more suitable habitat on the western side of Puerto Rico (White et al. 2014). 

To learn more about the Puerto Rican Parrot, visit this page.

 

Puerto Rican Broad-winged Hawk (Buteo platypterus brunnescens): Endangered

The Puerto Rican broad-winged hawk (PRBWHA) was federally listed as endangered in 1994. This hawk is an endemic woodland raptor of upland montane forests of Puerto Rico (Hengstenberg and Vilella 2005). It is a subspecies of the broad-winged hawk. Breeding in Puerto Rico begins in late December, with nests placed in the upper reaches, but below the high canopy (Delannoy and Tossas 2002). This species occurs in Elfin Woodland, Sierra Palm, Caimitillo-Granadillo, and Tabonuco Forest type of the Rio Abajo Commonwealth Forest (Western Puerto Rico), Carite Commonwealth Forest (Southeastern Puerto Rico), and El Yunque (USFWS 2010). The raptor is known to prefer forest types with an open mid-story vegetation structure to prey on species such as lizards and small birds. The broad-winged hawk in Puerto Rico is non-migratory and exhibits a limited geographic range with all known populations restricted to Montane Forests (Delannoy 1997). The hawk’s population was estimated at about 125 individuals Islandwide in 1994 (USFWS 2010). There have been very few observations of the broad-winged hawk in annual bird counts, but it is known to still exist on El Yunque.

The Puerto Rican broad-winged hawk’s density and population estimates varied considerably among forests, being highest at Rio Abajo Forest and lowest in EYNF (Delannoy 1995). As far as current PRBWHA population indices in EYNF, there are none. Unfortunately, observations and anecdotal references exhibit substantial concern for a renewed effort toward population surveys and aligning with relevant land management agencies to address the recovery plan on this species.

Dr. Francisco Vilella´s understanding of this species’ conditions are the following: “they [PRBWHA] have gone from six or more breeding territories during my time in the Puerto Rican parrot project to a single pair sighted near El Toro” (Vilella, 2016).

To learn more about the Puerto Rican broad-winged hawk, visit this page.

 

Puerto Rican Sharp-shinned Hawk (Accipiter striatus venator): Endangered

The Puerto Rican sharp-shinned hawk (PRSSHA), a subspecies of the sharp-shinned hawk, was designated a federally endangered species in 1994. There are more individuals outside of EYNF, but a survey by Delannoy (1992) reported only a solitary territorial hawk pair in the southcentral part of the Forest.  This area is located within the Palo Colorado Forest type in the Lower Mountane Forest Life Zone (Ewel and Whitmore 1973).  Historically, sixty individuals of Puerto Rican sharp-shinned hawks were counted in Island-wide surveys conducted in 1983, and a breeding density of 0.73 hawks per square kilometer was estimated (Cruz and Delannoy 1986). In 1985, 72 individuals were counted and a breeding population of 0.76 hawks per square kilometer (230 to 250 Island-wide) was estimated in Island-wide surveys (Cruz and Delannoy 1986). In 1992, a total of 285.6 square kilometers was surveyed yielding 82 sharp-shinned hawks: 80 outside of EYNF and 2 within EYNF.  

The hawk prefers an open mid-story vegetation structure for its preferred prey species of lizards and small birds.

As of late, available information on the PRSSHA indicates populations are small and mostly restricted to montane forest reserves; virtually no information exist of PRSSHA on private lands. 

According to Gallardo (2014), all Caribbean subspecies appear to be declining and the PRSSHA has exhibited a population reduction of 40% on public lands.   “Recent field work and censuses suggest they [PRSSHA] have been extirpated in the Maricao Forest and potentially isolated in the rest of their range to a few montane reserves” (Gallardo and Vilella, 2014).

To learn more about the Puerto Rican Sharp-shinned Hawk, visit this page.

 

Elfin-Woods Warbler (Setophaga angelae): ThreatenedElfin Woods Warbler Spotlight

The Elfin-woods warbler was listed as a threatened species in June 2016.  The species is endemic to Puerto Rico and has been reported in Humid Montane Forest habitats.  Initially thought to occur only in the Luquillo Mountains (EYNF), this species was later discovered in the Maricao, Toro Negro, and Carite State forests (Gochfeld et al. 1973; Cruz and Delannoy 1984a; Raffaele 1998).  Kepler and Parkes (1972) described the elfin-woods warbler from the high elevation Elfin Woodland Forests (2,099 to 3,378 feet) even though they were also found in Palo Colorado Forests on EYNF. Wiley and Bauer (1985) later reported the species from the Elfin Forests and lower elevation forests (1,213 to 1,968 feet) such as Palo Colorado and Sierra Palm forests in the EYNF.  According to Arendt (2013), “since its discovery and classification there has been concern regarding the status and future of this species due to its limited range and dwindling habitat and predicted repercussions of escalating climate change.

Recent published studies on El Yunque National Forest conducted by Arendt (2013), included bird surveys that follow 30 transect points in each forest type in two days (15 points per day) between 05h30 and 09h30 AST (Atlantic Standard Time). Surveys were conducted approximately monthly from 1989 to 2006. To minimize observer bias, three field biologists conducted most of the surveys over the 17-year period.   By determining EWWA population density, Arendt (2013) documented its continuous decline in eastern Puerto Rico. The species showed a significant general declining trend from approximately 0.2 individuals/ha in 1989 to approximately 0.02/ha in 2006 in elfin woodland, and from 1 to 0.2 in palo colorado forest types.

The USFWS has completed a candidate conservation agreement (CCA) with EYNF in 2014 because this forest is one of the last two locations in Puerto Rico where the warbler is found.  The CCA is summarized as a binding agreement between the USFWS, Puerto Rico Department of Natural and Environmental Resources, and the US Forest Service-EYNF in five conservation themes.  These themes are strategic conservation actions, habitat restoration, species’ ecology, monitoring, and education/outreaches.  Each agency partner are expected to commit in their own legal authority and report to a technical team dedicated to the species’ status.

To learn more about the Elfin-Woods Warbler, visit this page.

 

Puerto Rican Boa (Epicratus inornatus): Endangered

Listed as an endangered species in 1970, this boa is found mostly in the northern half of the Island of Puerto Rico.  Wiley (2003) collected data from 1973 through 1986 and reported several new localities to the PR boa distribution, also showing that boas are widespread in Puerto RicoWunderle et al (2004) studied habitat use of the boa in EYNF and indicated that, although the boa were located in a variety of microhabitats (i.e., vine enclosed broadleaf trees shrubs, vine tangles, bamboo, dead trees, buildings and streams), the boa mostly occurred in broadleaf trees followed by ground or below-ground sites.  This radio telemetry study by Wunderle at EYNF monitored 24 snakes with a total 70 tagged Puerto Rican boas with transponders (pit-tags).  Boas were found incidentally during daylight and evening hours while walking or driving to sites with radio-marked boas.  According to Wunderle et al. (2004), much of the boa’s apparent rarity is related to the observer’s ability to visually detect this cryptic species within the forest.  As an example, Wunderle et al. (2004) failed to visually detect telemetry-tracked boas an average of 85 percent of their telemetry relocations. Given this detection difficulty in the forest, it is likely that the species is more abundant than generally perceived.  According to the findings of Wunderle et al. (2004), habitat use differed significantly among sexes with females spending more time on or below ground than males. “Thermoregulation requirements of gravid females may contribute to use of exposed terrestrial debris piles (Wunderle et al. 2004).  

The Puerto Rico Gap Analysis Project developed an occurrence map and predicted distribution map of the Puerto Rican Boa (Gould et al., 2008). This map illustrates that the known occurances of the boa are highly scattered and fragmented across northern Puerto Rico, but the predicted probable distribution is island wide.

To learn more about the Puerto Rican Boa, visit this page.

 

White-necked Crow (Corvus leucognaphalus): Extirpated from Puerto Rico

The endangered white-necked crow no longer exists on the Island of Puerto Rico, but still occurs in neighboring Dominican Republic (Island of Hispaniola). The bird had an original range of both of the Greater Antilles Islands (Puerto Rico and Hispaniola), but over time was confined to only one Island. Due to considerable lowland forest clearance and hunting, the species was last seen in Puerto Rico in 1963. There is a low potential for reintroduction of this species, but El Yunque would be a likely location for its recovery.

There will be no analysis of trends or drivers for this species since the species does not occur on the Island of Puerto Rico as unofficially accepted by Federal and state land managing agencies.

 

Species of Conservation Concern

Forest managers identify species for which there is substantial concern about their capability to persist over the long term in order to make management decisions that help these species survive; these are called species of conservation concern.

Many of the species of conservation concern are also considered to be at-risk species by the USFWS; many have been petitioned to be listed under the Endangered Species Act. In Puerto Rico, large publicly owned landscapes such as El Yunque support some of the best habitat and highest densities of at-risk species in the commonwealth.

Species of conservation concern (fauna – 23 species)

Taxonomic Group Taxonomic Sub-Group Species Common Name
Amphibian Frog

Eleutherodactylus brittoni

Grass Coqui
Amphibian Frog

Eleutherodactylus eneidae

Eneida's coqui Mottled Coquí
Amphibian Frog

Eleutherodactylus gryllus

Cricket coqui
Amphibian Frog

Eleutherodactylus hedricki

Hedrick's coqui
Amphibian Frog

Eleutherodactylus karlschmidti

Web-footed coqui
Amphibian Frog

Eleutherodactylus locustus

Locust coqui
Amphibian Frog

Eleutherodactylus portoricensis

Upland coqui

Forest coqui

Amphibian Frog

Eleutherodactylus richmondi

Richmond's coqui
Amphibian Frog

Eleutherodactylus unicolor

Dwarf coqui
Amphibian Frog

Eleutherodactylus wightmanae

Wrinkled coqui
Aquatic Eel Anguilla rostrata American eel
Aquatic Fish

Awaous banana

Yellow river goby
Aquatic Fish

Dormitator maculatus

Fat sleeper
Aquatic Fish

Eleotris pisonis

Spinycheek sleeper
Aquatic Fish

Gobiomorus dormitor

Bigmouth sleeper
Aquatic

Invertebrate

Macrobrachium carcinus Bigclaw river shrimp
Aquatic

Invertebrate

Macrobrachium crenulatum Crenulated river shrimp
Bird Bird

Falco peregrinus

Peregrine falcon
Bird Bird

Icterus portoricensis

Puerto Rican oriole
Mammal

Bat

Stenoderma rufus Red-fig eating bat
Mollusc Snail  

Luquillia luquillensis

Luquillo mountain land snail
Reptile Lizard

Anolis cuvieri

Puerto Rican giant anole
Reptile Lizard

Anolis occultus

Dwarf anole

Pygmy anole

 


 

Especies amenazadas y en peligro de extinción / Especies con Prioridad para Conservación

Esta sección trata de especies amenazadas y en peligro de extinción protegidas por el gobierno federal (especies T&E, por sus siglas en inglés) y cualquier candidato aplicable y especie propuesta, que requiera protección o consulta respecto a la Ley de Especies en Peligro de Extinción (36 CFR 219.16). El Servicio Forestal coopera con el Servicio de Pesca y Vida Silvestre de Estados Unidos (USFWS, por sus siglas en inglés) en la identificación y evaluación de especies con probabilidad de afectarse y en el desarrollo de componentes de planificación que contribuyan a su recuperación.

Para referencia específica a la Ley de Tratado de Aves Migratorias de 1918 (Migratory Bird Treaty Act), hay dos especies de la lista de 2008 del Servicio de Pesca y Vida Silvestre de E.E.U.U. para las Islas caribeñas de E.E.U.U. (Puerto Rico e Islas Vírgenes). Estas dos especies son la Reinita de Bosque Elfino (Setophaga angelae) y la Calandria Puertorriqueña (Icterus portoricensis). Estas dos especies son descritas más a fondo en la sección de especies de fauna en riesgo dado a la condición de la Reinita de Bosque Elfino como una especie listada a nivel federal y la Calandria Puertorriqueña como una especie de prioridad para la conservación.  Para obtener más información, consulte la Declaración de Impacto Ambiental Final.

 

Especies amenazadas y en peligro de extinción

Especies con Prioridad para Conservación

 

Especies amenazadas y en peligro de extinción

Todas las especies T&E se continuarían manejando y protegiendo a lo largo del Bosque Nacional en cumplimiento de política pública del Servicio Forestal, medidas de protección recomendadas en los planes de recuperación y todas las leyes estatales y federales aplicables.

Lista de especies amenazadas o en peligro de extinción protegidas por el gobierno federal (especies T&E) y candidatas a protección, del Bosque Nacional El Yunque:

Nombre común

 

Nombre científico

Categoría Condición
Cotorra Puertorriqueña Amazona vittata Ave En peligro de extinción
Guaraguao de Bosque Buteo platypterus brunnescens Ave En peligro de extinción
Falcón de Sierra Accipiter striatus venator Ave En peligro de extinción
Reinita de Bosque Enano Setophaga angelae Ave Amenazado
Boa Puertorriqueña Epicratus inornatus Reptil En peligro de extinción
Cuervo de cuello blanco Corvus leucognaphalus Ave Extirpado de Puerto Rico

 

Cotorra puertorriqueña (Amazona vittata): en peligro de extinciónPhoto of Puerto Rican Parrot

Una vez dispersa por toda la Isla, la Cotorra Puertorriqueña fue reducida a una pequeña población en el Bosque Nacional El Yunque, una de las pocas áreas foretadas que permanecieron en la Isla para los últimos años de la década de 1930 (Brash 1987, Snyder et al. 1987). La Cotorra Puertorriqueña fue clasificada como en peligro de extinción en 1968. Esta especie es la única cotorra nativa en los Estados Unidos y fue considerada como una de las diez aves en mayor peligro de extinción en el mundo. Casi todos los aspectos del ciclo de vida de esta especie, inlcuyendo la mayoría de las interacciones bióticas (por ejemplo, depredadores y ectoparásitos), han sido manejadas para promover su persistencia (USFWS 2009). El ave no está asociada a un  hábitat específico en El Yunque, pero “Se conoce que las Cotorras Puertorriqueñas en general habitan un amplio rango de tipos de bosque, regularmente volando largas distancias para obtener alimento (Snyder et al. 1987).

Antes de los huracanes de 2017 habían de 53 a 56 individuos silvestres sobreviviendo en El Yunque y de 134  individuos silvestres en el Bosque Estatal de Río Abajo. Luego de los huracanes Irma y María, el número de individuos silvestres sobrevivientes se redujo a 3 a 11 para El Yunque y 104 en el Bosque Estatal de Río Abajo, Dos aviarios combinados de poblaciones en cautiverio contienen más de 350 individuos el avriario Iguaca y el aviario José L. vivaldi en El Yunque y el Bosque Estatal de Río Abajo, respectivamente. La especie en 1976 tenía una población de solo 13 individuos y actualmente tiene una población, incluyendo aquellas aves en cautiverio, de aproximadamente 500 individuos (Vélez, 2016). De acuerdo al análisis de viabilidad  de población (2003) de la Cotorra Puertorriqueña, la especie está aún saliendo lentamente de una situación de cuello de botella. Esfuerzos interagenciales han estado abordando los factores limitantes de crecimiento poblacional  para asistir en alcanzar un estado más viable. El esfuerzo interagencial también se ha percatado que El Yunque no es hábitat óptimo para la Cotorra Puertorriqueña y prevén un crecimiento poblacional más prometedor en una ubicación para una tercera población silvestre en el área oeste de Puerto Rico, según ha sido demostrado por la población anteriormente introducida en el Bosque Estatal de Río Abajo (White et al 2014).

Para obtener más información sobre la Cotorra Puertorriqueña, visite esta página.

 

Guaraguao de Bosque de Puerto Rico (Buteo platypterus brunnescens): En peligro de extinción

El Guaraguao de Bosque de Puerto Rico (PRBWHA) se añadió a la lista de protección federal para especies en peligro de extinción, en 1994 (Federal Register 1994). Este guaraguao es un raptor endémico de bosques montanos altos (Hengstenberg y Vilella, 2005). Es una subespecie del Guaraguao de Bosque y anida en Puerto Rico comenzando a finales de diciembre, donde coloca nidos en las elevaciones más altas pero debajo del alto dosel (Delannoy y Tossas 2002). Esta especie se encuentra en tipos de bosque enano, palmas de sierra, caimitillo-granadillo y tabonuco, del Bosque Estatal de Río Abajo (en la parte oeste de Puerto Rico), Bosque Estatal de Carite (en la parte sureste de Puerto Rico) y en El Yunque (USFWS 2010). Se conoce que el raptor prefiere tipos de bosque con estructura vegetativa abierta en la parte intermedia del dosel debido a que allí encuentra las especies de presa que prefiere, como lagartijos y aves pequeñas. El Guaraguao de Bosque de Puerto Rico no es migratorio y tiene un alcance geográfico limitado, donde todas las poblaciones conocidas se restringen a los bosques montanos (Delannoy 1997). En 1994, la población de este guaraguao se estimó en 125 individuos, para toda la isla. Aunque apenas se observa este guaraguao en los conteos anuales de aves, se conoce que aún existe en El Yunque.

Para obtener más información sobre el Guaraguao de Bosque de Puerto Rico, visite esta página.

 

Falcón de sierra de Puerto Rico (Accipiter striatus venator): En peligro de extinción

El Falcón de Sierra de Puerto Rico, una sub especie del Falcón de Sierra, fue designado como especie en peligro de extinción en 1994. Hay más individuos fuera de El Yunque, pero un estudio hecho por Delannoy (1992) reportó una sola pareja de falcones territoriales en la parte sur central del bosque. Esta área está ubicada en el Bosque de Palo Colorado en la Zona de Vida de Bosque Montano Bajo (Ewel y Whitmore 1973). Históricamente, sesente individuos fueron contados en un estudio a nivel de Isla en 1983, y una densidad de reproducción de 0.73 falcones por kilómetro cuadrado fue estimada (Cruz y Delannoy, 1986). En 1992, un total de 285.5 kilómetros cuadrados fueron estudiados resultando en 82 Falcones de Sierra: 80 fuera de El Yunque y dos dentro de El Yunque.

El Falcón prefiere un sotobosque abierto en cuanto a estructura de vegetación para sus especies de presa preferidas, que son lagartijos y aves pequeñas.

Según Gallardo (2014), todas las subespecies de falcón en el Caribe parecen estar disminuyendo y el Falcón de Sierra de Puerto Rico ha exhibido una reducción poblacional de 40% en terrenos públicos. “Trabajos de campo y censos recientes sugieren que los falcones han sido extirpados en el bosque Estatal de Maricao y potencialmente aisladas en el resto de su rango a algunas reservas montanas.” (Gallardo y Vilella, 2014).

Para obtener más información sobre el Falcón de Sierra de Puerto Rico, visite esta página.

 

Reinita de Bosque Enano (Setophaga angelae): AmenazadaElfin Woods Warbler Spotlight

La Reinita de Bosque Enano fue catalogada como especie amenazada en junio, 2016. La especie es endémica en Puerto Rico y ha sido reportada en hábitats de Bosque Montano Húmedo. Aunque incialmente se pensaba que ocurría solo en la Sierra de Luquillo (El Yunque), esta especie fue luego descubierta en los bosques estatales de Maricao, Toro Negro, y Carite  (Gochfeld et al. 1973; Cruz and Delannoy 1984a; Raffaele 1998).  Kepler y Parkes (1972) describieron la Reinita de Bosque Elfino dado a los boques elfinos de alta elevación (2,099 a 3,378 pies) aunque también se encontraban en los bosques de Palo Colorado en El Yunque. Wiley y Bauer (1985) más tarde reportaron la especue desde los bosques enano s y bosques de elvaciones más bajas (1,213 a 1,968 pies) como los bosques de Palo Colorado y Plama de Sierra en El Yunque. De acuerdo a Arendt (2013), “desde su descubrimiento y clasificación, ha habido preocupación respecto al estado y futuro de esta especie debido a su rango limitado y hábitat decreciente y repercusiones pronosticadas dado al cambio climático.

Estudios recientemente publicados en el Bosque Nacional El Yunque llevados a cabo por Arendt (2013), incluyeron estudios de aves que siguieron 30 puntos de transectos en cada tipo de bosque en 2 días (15 puntos por día) entre 5:30 pm y 9:30 pm AST (hora estándar atlántica). Estudios fueron llevados a cabo aproximadamente mensualmente desde 1989 hasta 2006. Para minimizar parcialidad por parte del observador, tres biólogos de campo llevaron a cabo la mayor parte de los estudios durante el periodo de 17 años. Al determinar la densidad poblacional de la Reinita de Bosque Enano, Arendt documentó su constante disminución en el este de Pûerto Rico. La especie demostró un a disminución general de aproximadamente 0.2 individuos/ha en 1989 a aproximadamente 0.02 individuos/ha en 2006 en bosques elfinos, y de 1 a 0.2 en bosques de palo colorado.

El Servicio de Pesca y Vida Silvestre (USFWS) ha completado un acuerdo de conservación de especies candidatas con El Yunque en 2014 ya que este bosque es uno de los únicos dos lugares donde se encuentra la Reinita. Este acuerdo es resumido como un acuerdo enlazante entre el Servicio Forestal, USFWS, Departamento de Recursos Naturales y Ambientales de Puerto Rico en cinco temas de conservación. Estos temas son acciones estratégicas de conservación, restauración de hábitat, ecología de especies, monitorieo y educación/enlace. Se espera que cada agencia aliada se comprometa bajo su propia autoridad legal y reporte a un equipo técnico dedicado al estado de la especie. 

Para obtener más información sobre la Reinita de Bosque Enano , visite esta página.

 

Boa Puertorriqueña (Epicratus inornatus): En peligro de extinciónPhoto of PR Boa, Boa de PR

Listada como especie en peligro de extinción en 1970, esta boa es encontrada prncipalmente en la mitad norte de la Isla de Puerto Rico. Wiley (2003) coleccionó datos desde 1973 hasta 1986 y reportó varias nuevas ubicaciones a la distribución de la Boa Puertorriqueña, también demostrando que la boa está dispersa por todo Puerto Rico. Wunderle et al. (2004) estudió el uso de hábitat de la boa en el El Yunque e indicó que, aunque la boa se encuentra en una variedad de microhábitats (por ejemplo, árboles de hojas anchas con enredaderas, arbustos, enredaderas, bambú, árboles mueros, edificios y quebradas), la boa se encuntraba mayormente en árboles de hoja ancha, seguido por sitios en los suelos o bajo el suelo. El estudio de radiotelemetría hecho por Wunderle en El Yunque monitoreó 24 serpientes y un total de 70 Boas Puertorriqueñas etiquetadas. Las boas fueron encontradas incidentalmente durante el día y horas de la tarde mientras se conducía o caminaba a lugares con boas etiquetadas. De acuerdo a Wunderle et al (2004), mucha de la aparente rareza de la boa es relacionada a la habilidad del observador de poder detectar esta especie críptica dentro del bosque. A modo de ejemplo, Wunderle et al. (2004) fallaron en detectar visualmente boas que fueron encontradas con radiotelemetría un promedio de 85 por ciento de las veces. Dado a esta dificultad en detectar la boa en el bosque, es posible que la especie es más abundante que lo que usualmente se percibe. De acuerdo a los hallazgos de Wunderle et al. (2004), el uso de hábitat varió significativamente entre sexos, con las hembras pasando más tiempo en o debajo del suelo que los machos. “Requerimientos de termorregulación de hembras grávidas puede contribuir a que las hembras usen materia orgánica agregada en el suelo” (Wunderle et al. 2004).

El “Puerto Rico Gap Analysis Project” desarrolló un mapa de ocurrencia y predijo un mapa de distribución de la boa puertorriqueña (Gould et al., 2008). Este mapa ilustra que las ocurrencias conocidas de la boa son altamente dispersas y fragmentadas a lo largo del norte de Puerto Rico, pero la distribución probable predecible es a través de todo Puerto Rico.

Para obtener más información sobre la Boa Puertorriqueña, visite esta página.

 

Cuervo de cuello blanco (Corvus leucognaphalus): Extirpado de Puerto Rico

El cuervo de cuello blanco en peligro de extinción ya no existe en la isla de Puerto Rico, pero sí se encuentra en el país vecino de República Dominicana (isla La Española). El ave tuvo un alcance original que incluía ambas islas de las Antillas Mayores (Puerto Rico y La Española), pero a lo largo del tiempo se redujo hasta encontrarse en una sola isla. Debido a la despoblación forestal considerable de las tierras bajas y la caza, la especie se vio en Puerto Rico por última vez en 1963. Aunque haya un bajo potencial para la reintroducción de esta especie, El Yunque sería un lugar probable para su recuperación.

No hay análisis de modalidades ni conductores de esta especie ya que la especie no se encuentra en la isla de Puerto Rico, condición que se acepta de manera no oficial por las agencias federales y estatales que administran las tierras. El Bosque Nacional espera en lo que estas agencias federales y estatales notifiquen oficialmente este hecho que es científicamente aceptado.

 

Especies con Prioridad para Conservación

Los administradores de los bosques identifican las especies para las cuales hay una inquietud sustancial sobre su capacidad para persistir a largo plazo, de manera que se puedan tomar decisiones de manejo que puedan ayudar a estas especies a sobrevivir; estas se denominan especies de interés para la conservación.

Muchas de las Especies con Prioridad para Conservación también se consideran como especies en riesgo por el Servicio de Pesca y Vida Silvestre de Estados Unidos y se ha solicitado que muchas se incluyan en la lista de especies preparada mediante la Ley de Especies en Peligro de Extinción. En Puerto Rico, los grandes paisajes bajo dominio público, como El Yunque, sostienen algunos de los mejores hábitats y mayores densidades de especies en riesgo, en Puerto Rico.

Especies con Prioridad para Conservación (fauna-23 especies)

Taxonomía Grupo Taxonomía Subgrupo Especie Nombre Común
Anfibio Sapo

Eleutherodactylus brittoni

Grass Coqui

Coquí de las Yerbas

Anfibio Sapo

Eleutherodactylus eneidae

Coquí de Eneida
Anfibio Sapo

Eleutherodactylus gryllus

Coquí Grillo
Anfibio Sapo

Eleutherodactylus hedricki

Coquí de Hedrick
Anfibio Sapo

Eleutherodactylus karlschmidti

Coquí Palmeado
Anfibio Sapo

Eleutherodactylus locustus

Coquí Martillito
Anfibio Sapo

Eleutherodactylus portoricensis

Coquí de la Montana
Anfibio Sapo

Eleutherodactylus richmondi

Coquí Caoba
Anfibio Sapo

Eleutherodactylus unicolor

Coquí Duende
Anfibio Sapo

Eleutherodactylus wightmanae

Coquí Melodioso
Aquatico Eel Anguilla rostrata Anguila
Aquatico Pez

Awaous banana

Saga
Aquatico Pez

Dormitator maculatus

Fat sleeper
Aquatico Pez

Eleotris pisonis

Guavina espinosa
Aquatico Pez

Gobiomorus dormitor

Guabina
Aquatico

Invertebrado

Macrobrachium carcinus Camarón de Río, Langostino
Aquatico

Invertebrado

Macrobrachium crenulatum

Coyuntero

Crenulated river shrimp

Aves Aves

Falco peregrinus

Falcón Peregrino
Aves Aves

Icterus portoricensis

Puerto Rican oriole
Mamifero

Murciélago

Stenoderma rufus Murciélago Rojo Frutero
Molusco Caracol  

Luquillia luquillensis

Luquillo mountain land snail
Reptil Lagarto

Anolis cuvieri

Lagarto Verde
Reptil Lagarto

Anolis occultus

Lagartijo Pigmeo




https://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/elyunque/landmanagement/resourcemanagement/?cid=fseprd723552