Motorized Travel Management Planning

Red Jeep Driving on Forest RoadIn 2005, the Forest Service issued the Travel Management Rule, a new regulation that requires all 155 National Forests in the country to have a system of designated roads, trails and areas for motor vehicle use by vehicle type and, if appropriate, by season of use. The Rule also prohibited cross–country motor vehicle travel. 

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) 

An updated version of the Fremont-Winema National Forest’s MVUM was made available to the public on May 5, 2014. This was the first revision to the original MVUM published on Feb 14, 2012. The 2014 MVUM designates approximately 6,384 miles of roads and 170 miles of motorized trails for a total of 6,554 miles.

Travel Analysis Report

The Fremont-Winema Travel Analysis Report outlines existing road systems and identifies opportunities to achieve a more sustainable system of roads for the forest. These reports are not decision documents—instead, they provide an analysis of where the existing road system is today. All future proposed actions and decisions will involve further opportunities for public input and engagement at the project-level under national environmental policy act processes.

Fremont-Winema National Forest Travel Analysis Report (.pdf)

Travel Analysis News Release 12/16/2015

Frequently Asked Questions about Travel Analysis

About Fremont-Winema National Forest Travel Analysis Report

The Travel Management Rule from 2005 established three subparts:

  • Subpart A – Administration of the Forest Transportation System;
  • Subpart B – Designation of Roads, Trails and Areas for Motor Vehicle Use;
  • and Subpart C – Use by Over-Snow Vehicles.

The Fremont-Winema National Forest completed Subpart B in summer 2010, resulting in the Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM), which has already undergone one revision. Subpart A looks at the core issue of Travel Analysis – providing sustainable access.

The Fremont-Winema National Forest’s extensive network of roads provides access to numerous areas of the forest. Yet there are factors managers need to consider, including impacts to natural and cultural resources and fiscal responsibility. Forest Resource Specialists are using a science-based process is taking a whole-forest look at the forest road system and the risks and benefits to both users and resources. The Fremont-Winema National Forest must complete the Travel Analysis Report by October 2015.

This process and the resulting report provide a mechanism that will allow us to be better informed as we make road maintenance decisions and as we work to support relevant land management objectives. 

Similar to Subpart B and the MVUM, this is an ongoing and living process, which begins through these initial steps. The resulting Travel Analysis Report will provide a foundation as discussion and input continues in the years to come. 

Travel Management Planning Background

The Fremont-Winema National Forest’s Motorized Travel Management Decision was signed in July 2010 designating approximately 6,426 miles of roads and 173.5 miles of trails (total of 6,599.5 miles) for public motorized use one of the highest levels of motorized access in the National Forest system. As a result, the Decision provides road or motorized trail access within a half mile of approximately 80 percent of the Forest.

In 2005, the Forest Service issued the Travel Management Rule, a new regulation that requires all 155 National Forests in the country to have a system of designated roads, trails and areas for motor vehicle use by vehicle type and, if appropriate, by season of use. The Rule also prohibited cross–country motor vehicle travel.

The Travel Management Rule resulted in consistent directions for motor vehicle use that improve the management of National Forest lands, sustain and protect natural and cultural resource values, enhance opportunities for motorized recreation and access, and preserve areas of opportunities on each National Forest for non-motorized travel and experiences.

The implementation of the Forest’s 2010 Motorized Travel Management Decision will take a long-term commitment from the Forest and strong partnerships with the public, user groups, adjacent landowners, The Klamath Tribes and other government agencies to be effective. It also involves working with Forest users to address the many road-related issues that were not resolved with the Decision.

Review our Travel Management Planning Background.





https://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/fremont-winema/landmanagement/planning/?cid=fsbdev3_061884