Stewardship Contracting and Retained Receipts

About Stewardship Contracting

To accomplish the Forest Service's stewardship responsibilities, creative approaches are needed to complete the necessary work and simultaneously contribute to the economic growth of local, rural communities.

Stewardship Contracting provides a means by which work may be accomplished using a single contract. During implementation, contract inspectors monitor compliance with the Stewardship Contract which contains provisions for resource protection, including but not limited to: seasonal restrictions, snag and coarse woody debris retention, stream protection, erosion prevention, soil protection, road closure and protection of historical sites.

Key Benefits:

Involvement of local communities, cooperating governmental agencies and others will be used to help monitoring efforts and develop specific pilot projects.

Receipts from stewardship projects remain on Forest to be reinvested into the project area and future restoration work.

Single entry, consolidation of multiple projects reduces impacts to other resources.

Find out more about Stewardship Contracting in the Forest Service from the Forest Service National Headquarters.

 

Gifford Pinchot National Forest Retained Receipts Projects:

Some forest restoration projects are funded by retained receipts from past stewardship timber sales.  Projects proposals are evaluated and prioritized by two collaborative groups made up of private citizens and local organizations, the Pinchot Partner and South Gifford Pinchot Collaborative,  in consultation with Forest Service personnel.  After the Forest Supervisor reviews the recommendations from the collaborative groups, projects are formally approved by the Regional Forester in Portland, OR.

This year a total of 15 projects totalling $500,000 were approved for funding.  The projects span the forest geographically.

Approved projects meet the following forest goals and objectives:

  • Improve habitat for both anadromous and inland fish species.
  • Reduce sediment input through improved watershed condition.
  • Improve habitat for wildlife.
  • Improve forest health and enhance native vegetation.
  • Control of invasive species

 

Approved Projects for 2018

Project

Description

18-NZ-01

Focused invasive plant control over about 90 acres dealing with aggressive, problematic species in Cowlitz County; also integrated restoration on 15 acres of watershed and 75 acres of terrestrial wildlife habitat improvement

18-NZ-02

Perform various restoration activities on the CVRD which may include erosion and sediment control along selected road and trail segments, improvement of the unit’s seed orchards, western white pine pruning to control white pine blister rust, and noxious weed removal; resulting in an estimated 68 acres of watershed restorations, 25 acres for forest stand improvement, and 15 acres treated for priority invasive species control.

18-NZ-03

Focused invasive plant control over about 50 acres dealing with aggressive, problematic species in the Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument; also integrated restoration on 10 acres of watershed and 50 acres of terrestrial wildlife habitat improvement.

18-NZ-04

Post restoration planting of 163 acres along the Cispus River associated with floodplain restoration that will improve aquatic wildlife habitat along 2.5 miles of streams, 163 acres of watershed improvement, 3 acres of terrestrial habitat improvement, and 163 acres of forest stand improvement.

18-NZ-05

Erosion and sediment control along approximately 15 miles of roads on the Cowlitz Valley Ranger District; treat selected road segments resulting in 44 acres of watershed improved.

18-NZ-06

Restoration of a shooting Area along the FR5290; including waste removal, stream bank stabilization, and native plant planting of disturbed areas.  Resulting in 2.8 acres of watershed improvement, invasive plants treated, and terrestrial wildlife habitat improvement.

18-NZ-07

Erosion and sediment control along approximately 19 miles of trail in the Goat Rocks and William O. Douglas Wildernesses, treat selected trail segments to improve watershed conditions and improve stream water quality resulting 19 acres of watershed improved.

18-NZ-08

Remove fish barriers at two stream crossings on the FR 4715, new culverts will be upgraded to meet new flood control standards and eliminate the barrier to fish passage and improve hydrologic function at these locations; resulting in 2.0 miles of aquatic wildlife habitat improvement and 60 ac of watershed improved.

18-NZ-09

Replace a forest closure gate that controls vehicle access to wildlife winter range, resulting in 400 acres of terrestrial wildlife habitat improved.

18-SZ-01

Perform various restoration activities on the Mt Adams and Mount St Helen’s Ranger Districts which may include erosion and sediment control along roads and trails, improvement of the unit’s seed orchards, western white pine pruning to control white pine blister rust, and noxious weed removal; resulting in an estimated 60 acres of watershed restorations, 80 acres for forest stand improvement, and 10 acres treated for priority invasive species control.

18-SZ-02

Erosion and sediment control along approximately 3 miles of road in the Government Mineral Springs area, treat selected trail segments to improve watershed conditions and improve stream water quality; resulting 10.8 acres of watershed improved and 0.75 miles of fish habitat improved.

18-SZ-05

Focused invasive plant control over about 50 acres dealing with aggressive, problematic species in the Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument; also integrated restoration on 10 acres of watershed and 50 acres of terrestrial wildlife habitat improvement.

18-SZ-06

Improving stand health and residence by reducing stand density on 539 acres of young dense forest stands and 539 acres of terrestrial wildlife habitat improved.

18-SZ-07

Reactivation of a side channel and placement of in-stream structures in the main stem of the Lewis River resulting in 0.75 miles of aquatic wildlife habitat improved, 3 acres of watershed improved,

18-SZ-10

Focused invasive plant control over about 250 acres dealing with aggressive, problematic species in the Wind River Drainage in Skamania County, resulting in 250 acres of invasives controlled and 250 acres of terrestrial habitat improved.

If you would have questions or would like additional information on the approved projects please contact Joe Gates, Forest Stewardship Coordinator at 360-891-5114.





https://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/giffordpinchot/landmanagement/resourcemanagement/?cid=fseprd498236