The National Historic Preservation Act

Enacted after the destruction of numerous buildings and sites in the years following World War II, the National Historic Preservation Act encourages Americans to identify and preserve our nation’s cultural and historic resources. The law establishes a national preservation program and procedural protections, including:

  • Federal preservation programs in each agency
  • State historic preservation programs, and later through amendments, tribal and local government programs
  • The Section 106 Review Process, which requires the federal government to take into account the effects of its undertakings on historic and cultural resources
  • The Historic Preservation Fund to provide grants to states, Certified Local Governments, and Indian tribes for projects relating to historic preservation
  • Public-private partnerships in support of common historic preservation goals

 

man working on roof of fire lookout

A HistoriCorps volunteer working on the Fairview Peak Fire Lookout has a spectacular view of the Gunnison National Forest, the La Garita and Collegiate Ranges and the Continental Divide. The one-room lookout, the highest in North America, was built in 1912. A stabilization and restoration project began in 2008. In 2015, the HistoriCorps helped to rebuild the cupola. (Photo courtesy Xavier Fane)


The US Forest Service Celebrates a Historic Preservation Milestone (USDA Blog)

The U.S. Forest Service has a deep appreciation for the thousands of people who work through programs designed to help preserve the nation’s historical and cultural heritage and resources on public lands.

U.S. Forest Service Chief Tom Tidwell presented the agency’s Windows on the Past award to two programs – the agency’s Passport in Time and the nonprofit HistoriCorps for work each does to help preserve this nation’s past.

Group of volunteeers holding banner PIT

Passport in Time volunteers are instrumental in restoring historic buildings and installing interpretive information at various sites on the Gunnison Ranger District.

For nearly 30 years, Passport in Time – also referred to as P.I.T. – has matched volunteers with Forest Service archeologists and historians for a variety of work, including archeological surveys, historic structure restoration and curation of artifacts. The SRI Foundation, which hosts the P.I.T. online clearinghouse, accepted the award.

HistoriCorps is a nonprofit organization that for about seven years has provided volunteers, students and veterans with skills through hands-on experience preserving historic structures on public lands across the U.S. HistoriCorps formed after the Forest Service approached Colorado Preservation Inc. with the idea of forming a community service program akin to the renowned Depression-era Civilian Conservation Corps.

Both programs provide valuable training and education as well as a personal connection to the land. These partnerships also help the Forest Service meet obligations under the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966. The Act served as a watershed event providing vision, goals and objectives in preservation of the nation’s cultural and heritage resources and is being commemorated during a three-year-long Preservation50 celebration.

Archeologists were hired to implement the act and, by 1977, the agency hired its first preservation officer to serve in Washington, D.C. Since then, the agency has identified and catalogued about 400,000 cultural resources scattered throughout 193 million acres of national forests and grasslands.

yong woman hammering on roof

A summer student secures roofing on Neosho Cabin (historic building) on the Grand Mesa, Uncompahgre and Gunnison National Forest. 

 

 Both programs provide valuable training and education as well as a personal connection to the land. These partnerships also help the Forest Service meet obligations under the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966. The Act served as a watershed event providing vision, goals and objectives in preservation of the nation’s cultural and heritage resources and is being commemorated during a three-year-long Preservation50 celebration.

Archeologists were hired to implement the act and, by 1977, the agency hired its first preservation officer to serve in Washington, D.C. Since then, the agency has identified and catalogued about 400,000 cultural resources scattered throughout 193 million acres of national forests and grasslands.

 





https://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/gmug/landmanagement/resourcemanagement/?cid=fseprd522733