Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation donates Candland Mountain Trailhead

People on horseback riding on top of plateau

Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation donates

Candland Mountain Trailhead

Sportsmen and women now have permanent access to 3,800 acres of National Forest land in central Utah thanks to a collaborative effort among the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation (RMEF), Manti-LaSal National Forest, Back Country Horsemen of Utah and Emery County.

RMEF recently conveyed a 10-acre parcel of land to the Manti-LaSal National Forest for a permanent public parking area at the Candland Mountain Trailhead about 20 miles west of Huntington, Utah along State Route 31.

The parking area is now within National Forest System lands and will be managed by the Ferron District of the Manti-La Sal National Forest. 

“This project shows how working together can bring about improved public access that benefits hunters, hikers, horseback riders and so many other people who enjoy our national forests,” said Blake Henning, RMEF chief conservation officer.

The Forest Service, which worked with the RMEF and others to facilitate the conveyance, is delighted with the improved access to non-motorized trails on the Forest.

“The Candland Mountain trail is about 5.6 miles long, and allows users to connect with the Mill Canyon Trail, Flood Canyon Trail, and the Left Fork of Huntington National Recreation Trail,” said Darren Olsen, Ferron-Price District Ranger. “The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation and its partners have provided a great service to the people who use Candland Mountain for hunting, hiking, horseback riding and other recreation.”

The area accessed by the trailhead is primarily elk spring through fall habitat, including calving areas, and is used by more than 1,000 elk. It is also home to mule deer, bear, mountain lions and a host of bird and animal life.

RMEF’s Torstenson Family Endowment (TFE) provided funding for the project. TFE funding is used solely to further RMEF’s core mission programs of permanent land protection, habitat stewardship, elk restoration and hunting heritage.
 



Highlights

  • Sage Grouse Grazing Permit Timeframe Link opens in a Pdf Document
    The Northern, Intermountain, and Rocky Mountain Regions of the Forests Service incorporated standards and guidelines for the conservation of greater sage-grouse into forest plans in 2015. All of the plan components for sage-grouse conservation remain in effect, but the timing of implementation of grazing guidelines will vary from the plans’ initial timelines.
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