Alaska Native Cultures

For thousands of years Native groups have lived in or near the Tongass and Chugach National Forests. Today 15% of Alaskans are native peoples. The Chugach, Kenaitze (also called Denaina Athabascan), and Eyak live near the Chugach National Forest. The Tlingit, Haida, and Tsimshian Tribes live near the Tongass. Today, as in the past, their cultures are intertwined with the resources of the forests. To learn more about Alaska Native cultures, visit these websites:

  • Alaska Region Tribal Relations -  The US Forest Service Alaska Region is committed to maintaining government-to-government relationships with tribes, acknowledging that these relationships are distinct from those with other interests or constituencies. The Region supports partnerships that integrate tribal perspectives on land management, recognizing that tribes are this land’s first stewards, conservationists and multiple users.
  • Alaska Native Heritage Center - The Alaska Native Heritage Center is a cultural center and museum in Anchorage.  The website includes information on all of Alaska’s Native cultures. It also describes educational programs offered at the center and in nearby schools.
  • USDA Forest Service Office of Tribal Relations - The Office of Tribal Relations facilitates consistency and effectiveness in Forest Service program delivery to Tribes, and institutionalizes long-term consultative and collaborative relationships with tribal governments through new policy and direction.
  • Alaska Native Knowledge Network - Alaska Native Knowledge Network provides a way for people to compile and exchange information on Native pathways to education, Alaska Native cultural resources, indigenous knowledge systems, and more.
  • Alaskool - A project of the University of Alaska, Anchorage, Alaskool offers information about Alaska Native history, education, languages and culture for teachers, students, and anyone interested in Alaska’s first people.
  • Alaska Native Language Center - The Alaska Native Language Center at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks is a center for research and documentation of the twenty Native languages of Alaska.


A member of the Mount St. Elias dancers participates in the Yakutat Tern Festival

A member of the Mount St. Elias dancers participates in the Yakutat Tern Festival

 



https://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/r10/learning/history-culture/?cid=stelprdb5377945