Year round learning with Cape Perpetua Fall Speaker Series

October 22, 2018: This fall, join guest speakers at Cape Perpetua for free educational presentations along with the hiking, tidepooling, and exploring. Presentations will be held every Saturday from November 3 to December 29 and will include a special focus on wildlife, geology, landscapes, and threatened species along with other unique topics.

Saturday, November 3, 1:00pm
Marbled Murrelets, Important Bird Areas, and Marine Reserves
Kim Nelson - Research Wildlife Biologist in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife at Oregon State University
Marbled Murrelets (Brachyramphus marmoratus) are small, cryptic seabirds that nest inland in older-aged forests in Oregon and elsewhere in the Pacific Northwest. Murrelet populations have declined over much of their range due primarily to current and historic loss and fragmentation of their forest breeding habitat. Changes in ocean conditions and prey availability are impacting nesting frequency and nesting success. The Siuslaw National Forest has some of the best remaining habitat for murrelets in Oregon and the highest densities of murrelets occur offshore of the Siuslaw along the central Oregon coast. Come learn about murrelet ecology, and the importance of the juxtaposition of the Cape Perpetua Important Bird Area and adjacent Marine Reserve.
 
Saturday, November 10, 1:00pm
Climate Change and Effect on Salmon
Dr. Rebecca Flitcroft – Research Fish Biologist, US Forest Service
This presentation will discuss climate change predictions for the Oregon Coast and how these may affect aquatic species, including salmon. Dr. Flitcroft is a Research Fish Biologist with the USDA Forest Service at the Pacific Northwest Research Station, Oregon. Her research focuses on aquatic systems from headwaters to the ocean, and her work involves collaboration with federal, state, private, and non-profit organizations.
 
Saturday, November 24, 1:00pm
Mountain Lions, Cougars, Panthers, Oh My!
Dave Thompson – Lifelong Educator
David Thompson, a lifelong educator, will recount his multiple encounters with a mountain lion while living in the Redwoods as a National Park Ranger.  Come enjoy this free 45 minute presentation at the Cape Perpetua Visitor Center Saturday, November 24th, at 1:00 and learn more about living with large predators. David’s storytelling has drawn record crowds at various venues in Oregon and this is his third time to present this program at Cape Perpetua Visitor Center.
 
Sunday, November 25, 1:00pm
Alsea Tribal Life at Cape Perpetua Prior to European Contact
Dick Mason – Cape Perpetua Volunteer
Learn about the pre-European inhabitants of Cape Perpetua from one of Cape Perpetua’s exceptional volunteers, Dick Mason. Dick will also take you on a quick and entertaining tour of world history that occurred while the Alsea were enjoying their evening seaweed and mussel dinners at Cape Perpetua.
 
Saturday, December 1, 1:00pm
King Tides, Sea Star Wasting, Marine Debris
Fawn Custer - CoastWatch Volunteer Coordinator
Fawn Custer will give a brief introduction to CoastWatch describing the various opportunities for volunteers who love the Oregon Coast to help document changes. King Tides will be the focus of this talk, and their impact on our shoreline and infrastructure. Fawn will explain the guidelines for the photos needed to document these events and how best to get involved.
 
Saturday, December 8, 1:00pm
The Impacts of Microplastics on a Near Shore Food Chain
Dorothy Horn - Marine Corps Veteran and a Graduate Research Fellow for the National Science Foundation
Dorothy will talk about the plastic pollution problem in the ocean, how it breaks down into microplastics as well as other sources of microplastic pollution. She will share the detrimental effects she has found and discuss the dangers to marine and possible human health effects. She will also discuss how this is not only a health issue but an economic one for folks that depend on the ocean for their livelihood and there are many things we can do to combat plastic pollution.
 
Saturday, December 15, 1:00pm
Orcas of the Oregon Coast
Colleen Weiler - WDC Fellow, Rekos Fellowship for Orca Conservation
Killer whales, also known as orcas, are perhaps the most widely recognized kind of whale or dolphin in the world.  With their distinctive black-and-white coloring, tall dorsal fins, and reputation as fearsome hunters, everyone knows what an orca is and how they live – or do we?  There is a lot more happening beneath the waves than first meets the eye.  With at least ten different types of orcas found in the world’s oceans and a long history of separation by appearance, diet, and culture, we may not know orcas as well as we think we do.  Three distinct kinds of orcas can be found off the coast of Oregon, separated by their favorite foods, social lives, and migratory patterns.  Join us to learn about the orcas of the Oregon Coast and how Oregonians can get involved in their survival.
 
Saturday, December 22, 1:00pm
How Rising Sea Levels Would Affect the Estuaries along the Central Oregon Coast
Fran Recht – Habitat Program Manager, Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission
Fran Recht will describe analyses done for the Newport-based MidCoast Watersheds Council about the impacts of Sea Level Rise on Oregon's tidal wetlands. The project assessed the extent of inundation that would occur in Oregon’s estuaries under five different sea level rise scenarios. Maps and graphs of local estuaries will help to clarify areas of vulnerability and where and to what extent tidal marshes will survive. The question of whether marshes will be able to migrate inland and up-slope as sea level rises considering constraining topography and infrastructure development, will be a key planning consideration on the Oregon coast.
 
Sunday, December 23, 1:00pm
Alsea Tribal Life at Cape Perpetua Prior to European Contact
Dick Mason – Cape Perpetua Volunteer
Learn about the pre-European inhabitants of Cape Perpetua from one of Cape Perpetua’s exceptional volunteers, Dick Mason. Dick will also take you on a quick and entertaining tour of world history that occurred while the Alsea were enjoying their evening seaweed and mussel dinners at Cape Perpetua.
 
Saturday, December 29, 1:00pm
Kevin Bruce/Molly Kirkpatrick – Siuslaw National Forest Archaeologists 
Join Forest Service archaeologists for an afternoon speaking session – more information to come. 

All events are free and open to the public, but a Northwest Forest Pass, Oregon Coast Passport, Federal Recreation Pass or $5 day-use fee is required within the Cape Perpetua Scenic Area and at many Oregon Dunes National Recreation Area recreation sites. For more information on any of these events, contact the Cape Perpetua Visitor Center at 541-547-3289. For information related to passes and permits, visit our website or call any office.





https://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/siuslaw/news-events/?cid=FSEPRD601872