Long-term Small Mammal Monitoring

OBJECTIVE/PURPOSE OF PROJECT:

This is a long-term (since 1983) monitoring program to track the dynamics of small mammal communities on the Superior NF. The purpose is to understand species ecology, population trends and dynamics, and detect potential effects to small mammal species populations from land management practices. Small mammal species are important to a variety of predators including species such as boreal owl, northern goshawk, great gray owl, fisher, American marten, and others.

METHODS OR TECHNIQUES USED:

The surveys are run in September and occurs at 18 sites for two days each (50 traps) for a total of 1,800 trap-nights. At two other sites small mammals are censused with a more intense effort, with one site with 50 traps for 6 nights, and the other with 100 traps for 6 nights, for a total of 900 trap-nights. The study totals approximately 2,700 trap-nights (+/- 10%).

REALIZED/EXPECTED RESULTS:

An annual report is produced providing information on population trends, species numbers, numbers per traps, plots of select species, and a shapefile with trap-line locations. Information can be used to evaluate impacts of land management practices on the National Forest. Data can also be used with other research and monitoring of predator species (ie boreal owl and others)to provide basic ecological and biological information on interspecies community dynamics. The 2010 Report should be available in Feb. 2011.

PRIMARY PARTNER LIST:

Fredrick Jannett

DESCRIPTION OF BENEFITS TO OTHER PROGRAM(S):

This monitoring project has also detected the Regional Forester sensitive species - Heather vole. It also provides potential for documenting the northern bog lemming (a potential sensitive species, if documented on the National Forest).





https://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/superior/landmanagement/resourcemanagement/?cid=stelprdb5209841