Features

Autumn Awareness in the National Forest

Crisp, clear days in the woodlands make this a popular time to hit the trails of Chattahoochee-Oconee National Forests.

But if you’re hiking, biking or riding the trails this season, please remember a few key things that will help keep you safe.

Foothills Landscape Community Collaboration

We are reaching out to partners, stakeholders and community members to realize a shared vision to address complex conservation challenges across the Foothills Landscape.We need your knowledge and insights right from the start in order to plan the right work in the right places for the right reasons.

History of Fire in the Southern Appalachians

Fire has been an essential natural process in Southern Appalachian oak and pine forests for thousands of years, and its absence over the past century has transformed our forests. Learn more about the fascinating relationship between fire and forest here in Georgia.

The best way to enjoy a waterfall? From a safe distance.

Waterfalls are exciting and rivers are a great place to cool off on a hot day, but both pose risks to unprepared visitors. We hope this information helps to make you aware of the hazards so you can enjoy a safe and fun visit to your National Forests in Georgia.

Every Kid in a Park

Fourth graders and their families can visit awesome recreation sites across Georgia's national forests free of charge. Print your pass today and let the adventure begin!

GA firefighters serving in the west; over 9 million acres burned

We care for the land and serve people- no matter what land is burning, no matter where those people are. In this year of wildfire disasters, it takes all of us.

Partnership mitigates wildfire risk to 50 million dollars in infrastructure

Together, the US Forest Service and National Park Service reduced the risk of wildfire to a critical communications site located on the national forest near Dalton, Georgia. With more than 40 antennae, the narrow mountaintop site houses the communication towers that serve approximately 600,000 people and multiple emergency responders in the local community. 

Looking for a shady spot to beat the heat?

Find detailed information about camping and other recreation opportunities available for you on Georgia’s national forests.

Fall Color 2015

Are you ready for fall color? The National Forests are! Find weekly updates, scenic drives, maps and more all right here.

Cool off river snorkeling; connect with nature

In clear, cool streams across the national forest, visitors are viewing wildlife in a whole new way by freshwater river snorkeling. Any clear river will do- just bring a swim suit, snorkel with a mask, and your sense of adventure. 

American Indian Partners Work to Protect Track Rock Gap

The Track Rock Gap rock art and stone landscape sites on the Chattahoochee National Forest were created by the ancestors of Creek and Cherokee people beginning more than 1,000 years ago.  Learn more about how the Forest Service works closely with Creek and Cherokee tribal governments to manage, protect and better understand these important, sacred ceremonial sites. 

Celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the Wilderness Act with Us

In 1964, President Lyndon Johnson signed the Wilderness Act into law. Since that time, much has been accomplished to protect our wilderness and benefit from all its values. Join us in celebrating this great natural resource.

Keener Bog: One of Georgia's Rarest Natural Communities

Mountain Bogs are one of the rarest habitats found in the all of the Southern Appalachians. This is especially true of Georgia's Blue Ridge, where only 15 to 20 true mountain bogs are known.

Welcome to Brasstown Bald, Georgia's Highest Mountain

Brasstown Bald, located in the Chattahoochee-Oconee National Forest, is a great place to visit and bring your family! The mountain offers spectacular views, cool mountain air temperatures, beautiful scenery, and a visitor center with a number of interactive exhibits and video presentations.

Georgia Plant Conservation Alliance Receives National Award

Almost 20 years ago, the Chattahoochee-Oconee National Forests joined with partners across the state to create a groundbreaking network for statewide plant conservation projects.  Today the Georgia Plant Conservation Alliance (GPCA) includes 31 gardens, organizations, universities, and agencies working together on more than 70 rare and endangered plant species throughout Georgia. GPCA’s successful projects on the national forest include ones focused on high elevation mountain bogs—one of Georgia’s rarest natural communities.

CoTrails Makes Strides in Forest-wide Trails Assessment

A unique collaborative effort to bring all types of trail users together to help identify and maintain a diverse, quality trail system on Georgia’s national forests has taken another leap forward with the completion of a forest-wide trails assessment.  Check out what the assessment found and the exciting next steps.

Are Your Great Outdoors Being Threatened by Invasive Species?

You bet they are. Thousands of non-native invasive plants, insects, fish, mollusks, crustaceans, pathogens, mammals, birds, reptiles, and amphibians have infested hundreds of millions of acres of land and water across the Nation, causing massive disruptions in ecosystem function, reducing biodiversity, and degrading ecosystem health in our Nation’s forests, prairies, mountains, wetlands, rivers, and oceans. Invasive organisms affect the health of not only the Nation’s forests and rangelands but also of wildlife, livestock, fish, and humans.

"Thinking Like a Landscape"

Aldo Leopold asked us all to "think like a mountain," recognizing the interconnectedness of natural systems. In this vein, we are reaching out to you help us “think like a landscape,” where together we can view the forest holistically, realizing ways to encompass multiple objectives and perspectives within the same landscape.

Cooper Creek Watershed Project Information

The purpose of the project is to restore healthier conditions for a diversity of native plants and to improve wildlife habitat for game and non-game species including deer, turkey, grouse, songbirds, bats, birds of prey, and pollinators. The primary focus is to make the forest more resilient and sustainable by reestablishing a healthy range of age and diversity of tree species, improving wildlife habitat and increasing watershed function. 

Striking a Balance for the Locust Stake OHV Trail System

This popular trail system was loved to death. Now, the Forest Service is moving ahead to improve the safety and sustainability in an effort provide a place for off-road riding while protecting natural resources. View the latest fact sheet.

Community Connections at Chattooga River Ranger District Office

Forest Service employees on the Chattahoochee-Oconee National Forests don’t just work in your community—they live there, too. In many communities the Forest Service is your largest neighbor, so making connections is important. For four members of Boy Scout Troop #6 of Rabun County, that connection was made strong last month.

Forest Service Employees Help Fulfill Holiday Hopes for Local Children

Chattahoochee-Oconee National Forests employees don't just work in your community, they live in it, too.  Find out how some Forest Service employees built a partnership with the Marine Toys for Tots Foundation that helped expand the group's ability to make the holidays brighter for less fortunate children here in Georgia.

Rainbow Gathering Information for the Chattahoochee National Forest

​The Rainbow Family of Living Light chose to hold its 2018 annual gathering on the Chattahoochee National Forest, Blue Ridge Ranger District. The unauthorized gathering site was located near Bull Mountain off of Forest Service Road 28-1 near Dahlonega.

The Threat of Non-native Invasive Species

The insidious and relentless invasion of species from other parts of the world continues to threaten the health of our native plant communities. Watch this short video to see how.

Welcome Betty Mathews, New Forest Supervisor

Meet Betty Mathews as she begins her new job as Forest Supervisor of the Chattahoochee-Oconee National Forests.

A Trail to Every Classroom in North Georgia

Summer brings to an end an incredible school year for Union County Middle School students who have been immersed in learning about a famous 2,181 mile long trail that begins nearby.  The Appalachian Trail was the subject of a school-wide, year-long education and outreach program called Trail to Every Classroom.

Former Forest Supervisor Named Federal Land Manager of the Year

George Bain, former Forest Supervisor of the Chattahoochee-Oconee National Forests in Georgia, is the 2012 Federal Land Manager of the Year for the USDA Forest Service. He was honored last month at a national awards ceremony in Washington, D.C. 

FS Law Enforcement Officers Connect with Kids at Career Day in Georgia

Law enforcement officers with the Chattahoochee-Oconee National Forests joined forces with about 70 other professionals recently to showcase their careers at Clarkesville Elementary School in Clarkesville, Ga.

Christopher Upton Honored by Georgia Law Enforcement Memorial

On April 12, 2011, the Georgia Law Enforcement Mobile Memorial Wall came to the Forest Supervisor’s office of the Chattahoochee-Oconee National Forests in Gainesville, GA to honor Chris and all law enforcement officers who lost their life in the line of duty.

Controlled Burning for Healthy Forest Management in the Appalachians

Fire is a very important element in the health of many ecosystems, whether it is a raging wildfire or a controlled burn. Of course, it's much better to have a controlled burn if you want a healthy forest. Take a look at this brochure to learn more about how fire is used as a tool to create healthier forests in the Appalachian Mountains.



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