Features

Rose Valley Creek Restoration Project

Many public resources and cultural values take place at Rose Valley Creek. Stream and habitat restoration is being proposed for Southern California steelhead and other federally protected wildlife. Along with stream restoration, floodplain function, water-holding properties, riparian vegetation, are expected to increase. Benefits to recreational opportunities and public resources will continue. Read more...

Mount Pinos Forest Health and Fuels Reduction Project

On April 7, Los Padres National Forest announced a plan to protect areas of the Mount Pinos Ranger District that are at risk to overstocking and the devastating impacts from disease and insect infestation. This forest health project was initially shared with the public in late 2019 during an open house and field visit to the project area. In 2006 public collaboration began when the project was listed in the Mount Pinos Community Wildfire Protection Plan.

The Mount Pinos Forest Health Project is located within a federally designated Insect and Disease Treatment Area where declining forest health conditions put the area at risk for substantial tree mortality over the next 15 years. In the 2014 Farm Bill, Congress authorized the U.S. Forest Service to prioritize work in these designated areas, and to expeditiously plan and implement projects to address the risk posed by insect and disease outbreaks.

Figueroa Wildflower Update for April 30, 2021

Hello everyone!

The winner of this update’s spectacular showcase is…(drum roll please)…the corridor between Ranger Peak and Cachuma Saddle. The bush lupine is lined up along much of this area in full bloom. Not only do their beautiful blue tones create a gorgeous sight, but the aroma they produce is simply breathtaking. Stunning bush poppies, sticky monkey flowers, Mexican elderberry and some scattered poppies (to mention a few) are currently adorning this area as well. If you want to see these lovelies in their peak, this is the time to do so as the bush lupine are starting to seed rapidly and won’t last long.. Read more...

Learn more about the Condor Sanctuary in the Los Padres

The Sanctuary lies within the Sespe Wilderness and is where the Forest Service provides critical habitat, wildlife refuge, and land management for the protection of the California condor.

 

Protecting Pine Mountain and Reyes Peak

On May 8, Los Padres National Forest introduced a plan to protect areas of Pine Mountain and Reyes Peak that are at risk due to overstocking and the devastating impacts from disease and insect infestation. The Reyes Peak Forest Health and Fuels Reduction Project lays within a federally designated Insect and Disease Treatment Area where declining forest health conditions have put the area at risk for substantial tree mortality over the next 15 years. The primary goal of this project is reduce tree densities to promote forest resilience to drought, insect and disease, and wildfire. To achieve this goal, professional Forest managers will selectively thin specific areas to enhance forest health across 755 acres on Pine Mountain between California Highway 33 and Reyes Peak in Ventura County.

Reducing Unhealthy Hazardous Fuels in the Los Padres National Forest

Fire specialists were back at work using fire to reduce unhealthy hazardous fuels that have built up in Los Padres National Forest. The Santa Lucia Ranger District is pile burning at the Figueroa Fire Station on Tuesday, February 18 throughThursday, February 20, 2020.

Thomas Fire Burn Area Emergency Response Team (BAER) ReportĀ 

The US Forest Service Burned Area Emergency Response (BAER) team’s purpose is to assess threats to life, property, and cultural and natural resources from fire-induced changes to the watershed that can cause erosion, sedimentation, flooding, and debris flows. The BAER team has completed their reports which provide a synopsis of BAER findings and the Forest Service’s internal request for implementation funding to treat values at risk on Forest Service lands only. The information generated by the BAER team is crucial for further analysis by other agencies affected by the fire to examine off-Forest values at risk within their jurisdiction.

Los Padres Partners with Parks Management Company to Manage Recreation Sites

On November 1, 2016, a new concessionaire Special Use Permit (SUP) was issued to Parks Management Company for campground and recreation site operations.

Under the new SUP, there will be changes to the recreation sites fees. The 18 sites newly added to the concession SUP that currently require an Adventure Pass will now require a $20-35 per night camping fee or $10 day-use fee for parking at trailheads and picnic areas. Interagency Senior and Access pass holders will receive a 50 percent discount on camping fees only - not valid for day use or parking at trailheads.

An annual pass for day-use sites will be available through Parks Management Company for $50 and will be good at any of the concession-managed day-use sites and trailheads on the Los Padres NF. Adventure Passes and Interagency Passes will not be accepted for parking in day use/picnic areas or trailheads. Learn more about the Parks Management Company

Women In Wildfire Training Camp 2017

The Los Padres National Forest hosted its third annual Women In Wildfire Training Camp on November 27 through December 2, 2016 in Santa Barbara, CA. The forest conducted a successful outreach this year and received over 160 applications, of which 23 participants were selected and successfully completed the training camp.

This year, the LP expanded the program by adding a day to the Training Camp and developing a more thorough screening process to improve the level of interest and dedication from participants. The camp provides a comprehensive wildland fire orientation, which includes classroom and hands-on field exercises as well as certification and physical agility test. Participants take part in leadership and teambuilding exercises and receive professional development training through resume and usajobs application workshops.

Celebrating 50 Years of American Wilderness!

In 2014, our nation celebrated "50 Years of Wilderness".

On September 3, 1964 President Lyndon B. Johnson signed into law the Wilderness Act. This historic bill established the National Wilderness Preservation System (NWPS) and set aside an initial 9.1 million acres of wildlands for the use and benefit of the American people. Over the past 50 years, and as a result of America's support for wilderness, Congress has added over 100 million acres to this unique land preservation system. The 1964 Wilderness Act defines "Wilderness" as areas where the earth and its communities of life are left unchanged by people, where the primary forces of nature are in control, and where people themselves are visitors who do not remain. To learn more about the Wilderness Act and the NWPS, visit http://www.wilderness.net, the official wilderness information website.



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