Recreation Passes & Permits

Which Pass Do I Need? To make the best choice on which pass to purchase, you should think about your recreation plans for the next year. You have options such as buying a single day pass, a multi-day pass, or even an annual pass that covers a forest or region. If you plan to recreate in many different spots across the nation, an Interagency Annual Pass may be your best value. You may also qualify for one of the Interagency Lifetime Passes (Interagency Senior Pass or Interagency Access Pass).   More.... Recreation Passes Available

 

Senior Pass now available online!

Recreational Residences Fees:

A Guide to Maintaining the Historic Character of Your Forest Service Recreation Residence (April 2014)

Fees:

WHY ARE FEES CHARGED TO RECREATION RESIDENCE PERMIT HOLDERS?

The Forest Service assesses and collects from permit holders an annual fee. Per Congressional direction, identifiable recipients who are granted something of value or a special service, such as a permit to use and occupy federal lands, are to be assessed a user fee representative of the fair market value of that privilege or service.

WHAT ARE RECREATION RESIDENCE FEES BASED ON?

To capture fair market value for the use granted by a recreation residence special use permit, the Forest Service has established that an annual fee be assessed on the basis of 5% of the estimated market value of the National Forest System land being used and occupied.

WHAT IS BEING APPRAISED?

Is it Both the Land and the Improvements?
Fair Market value is determined for a typical lot permitted within each Recreation Residence Tract. This is done by comparing the typical lot with similar privately owned lots which have sold in the area. The typical lot represents all other lots in the group. Only the lot itself will be appraised, not the improvements owned by the permit holder.

WHERE IS THE PROCESS NOW?

 Lots were last appraised and completed in 2008 and implemented in 2010.

WHERE DO THESE FEES GO?

Fees collected for recreation residence uses are deposited into the U.S. Treasury. Twenty-five percent of the fees goes to the local counties for roads and schools. The Forest Service currently has no authority to retain any part of these fees for administrative or management purposes.


 



https://www.fs.usda.gov/main/chippewa/passes-permits/recreation