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Urban and Community Forestry

Disaster Recovery— Making Urban Forests Safer After Storms

Many communities do not have adequate expertise or staffing to thoroughly assess tree damage after weatherrelated disasters. As a result, they sometimes remove valuable trees that should be saved, and they keep trees that pose hazards to public safety that should be removed. These communities also miss out on potential FEMA funding that could be used to reimburse them for costly storm-related tree work.

Tree Owner's Manual-National Edition

Description: 

One common issue facing our urban forests is the fact that trees are dying prematurely. Many are planted improperly, setting them up for failure. Many do not receive regular maintenance. And few are adequately protected during construction projects. To help remedy this issue, the Forest Service has created this manual. Just like the owner's manual that comes with automobiles and appliances, this manual includes a parts list, instructions for installation, tips for troubleshooting common issues, recommended service, and more.

Tree Owner's Manual-National Edition (Spanish)

Description: 

One common issue facing our urban forests is the fact that trees are dying prematurely. Many are planted improperly, setting them up for failure. Many do not receive regular maintenance. And few are adequately protected during construction projects. To help remedy this issue, the Forest Service has created this manual. Just like the owner's manual that comes with automobiles and appliances, this manual includes a parts list, instructions for installation, tips for troubleshooting common issues, recommended service, and more.

Three Governments Collaborate to Enhance Stream Health

The Challenge:

Emerald ash borer infestations and streambank degradation from urban storm water flows have combined to create harmful stream health conditions along the Chippewa River. Because sediment and nutrient runoff from the Chippewa River and its surrounding connected waterways ultimately flow into Lake Huron, these water bodies are key focal points to address the degraded conditions in Michigan’s Saginaw Bay Area of Concern. The bay itself has ample fish habitat; however, reduced water quality is impacting bay health and native fish populations.

Urban Forestry Success Story: Rainwater Rewards Calculator: Green Infrastructure Makes (dollars and) Sense

Great Lakes cities are a major source of stormwater runoff and pollutants that can harm natural ecosystems, their use, and the beauty of the freshwater resource. The western Michigan cities of Grand Rapids and Muskegon are no exception, with Lake Muskegon designated as an Area of Concern for having high levels of pollutants. Creating green infrastructure offers one way to mitigate these pollutants. The value of investing in green infrastructure to reduce this pollution requires

translation of environmental benefits to economic values for local decision making.

Dialogue on Diversity - Broadening the Voices in Urban and Community Forestry

Description: 

Does this sound familiar? You work to set up a meeting or workshop, and try your best to get a good cross-section of the community, and yet only the same people come. You contacted the local chamber of commerce, and sent an invitation to the city planner. You called the head of the local garden club and other service organizations. From federal agencies to small nonprofits, the desire to get more people involved in urban and community forestry has increased. Still, it's hard to get commitments from all parts of the community.

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https://www.fs.usda.gov/naspf/naspf-programs/urban-and-community-forestry