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Titlesort descending Description Author Publication ID Topic(s)
Pest Alert Asian Longhorned Beetle: A New Introduction NA-PR-01-99GEN The Asian longhorned beetle (ALB) has been discovered attacking trees in the United States. Tunneling by beetle larvae girdles tree stems and branches. Repeated attacks lead to dieback of the tree crown and, eventually, death of the tree. ALB probably traveled to the United States inside solid wood packing material from China. The beetle has been intercepted at ports and found in warehouses throughout the United States.
USDA Forest Service; USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service
NA-PR-01-99GEN
Insects and Diseases
Trees
Pest Alert Bur Oak Blight NA–PR–02–11 A serious leaf blight disease on bur oak has been recognized in several midwestern States since the 1990s with Iowa reporting its first occurrence of this disease 6 or 7 years ago. A common leafspot fungus, Tubakia dryina, was initially thought to be the cause of the blight on bur oak, but closer examination revealed a different story. Researchers in Iowa confirmed that this disease is caused by a new, and yet unnamed, species of Tubakia. The disease was named bur oak blight, or BOB for short.
Pokorny, Jill D.; Harrington, Thomas C.
NA–PR–02–11
Insects and Diseases
Trees
Pest Alert Eastern White Pine Needle Damage NA-PR-01-11 Eastern white pine is widespread and highly valued in New England. During the summer of 2010, white pine needle damage was frequently observed throughout New England. Symptoms consisted of yellow and brown discoloration of 1-year-old needles on both mature trees and regeneration. Trees most severely affected were growing at the edge of bodies of water; in wet areas; and on dry, steep slopes. This damage has been attributed to two foliar diseases, Canavirgella needle cast caused by the fungus...
Munck, Isabel A.; Ostrofsky, William D.; Burns, Barbara
NA-PR-01-11
Forests
Insects and Diseases
Pest Alert Bacterial Leaf Scorch Affects New Jersey State Tree NA-PR-01-00 Pest Alert - Bacterial Leaf Scorch (BLS) of northern red oak is widespread within New Jersey with many communities experiencing a high disease incidence. BLS is considered a threat not only to the state tree, northern red oak, but also to pin and scarlet oaks and other urban trees such as sycamore and elm.
Iskra, Alan; D’Errico, Mike; Sherald, Dr. James
NA-PR-01-00
Forests
Insects and Diseases
Pest Alert Beech Bark Disease NA–PR–03–12 Beech bark disease causes significant mortality and defect in American beech, Fagus grandifolia (Ehrh.). The disease results when bark, attacked and altered by the beech scale, Cryptococcus fagisuga Lind., is invaded and killed by fungi, primarily Nectria coccinea var. faginata Lohman, Watson, and Ayers, and sometimes Nectria galligena Bres.
USDA Forest Service, Northeastern Area State and Private Forestry
NA–PR–03–12
Insects and Diseases
Trees
Pest Alert Browntail Moth NA-PR-04-02 Pest Alert - The browntail moth, Euproctis chrysorrhoea, a native of Europe, was first found in North America in Somerville, Massachusetts, in the spring of 1897. Browntail moth caterpillars feed on leaves of many hardwood trees and shrubs. At high population levels, caterpillars may completely defoliate the host. Common host trees and shrubs include apple, oak, cherry, hawthorn, serviceberry, rugosa rose, and bayberry. Browntail moth caterpillar hairs can cause a skin rash on humans similar to...
USDA Forest Service, Northeastern Area State and Private Forestry
NA-PR-04-02
Insects and Diseases
Trees
Pest Alert Bruce Spanworm NA-FB/P-26 In the northern part of the USA and in Canada, the caterpillars of Bruce spanworm, Operophtera bruceata(Hulst), attack a variety of hardwood trees, but sugar maple,aspen, and beech are the favored host trees. In areas where these favored host trees are numerous, moderate to severe defoliation will occur. For the past two years, the insect has caused widespread defoliation in the New England States. Several hundred thousand acres have been defoliated in 1982/1983 with 330,000 acres in Maine...
Parker Snowden USDA Forest Service P.O. Box 640 Durham, NH 03824
NA-FB/P-26
Insects and Diseases
Pest Alert Butternut Canker NA-PR-04-95 Butternut canker is caused by a fungus known as Sirococcus clavigignenti-juglandacearum which is killing butternut(Juglans cinerea) throughout its range in North America. Butternut is closely related to black walnut (Juglans nigra), which is not naturally susceptible to the disease.
Unknown
NA-PR-04-95
Insects and Diseases
Pest Alert Canker Stain Affects Delaware Sycamores NA-PR-03-01 An often fatal disease of American sycamore (Platanus occidentalis), known as canker stain, is caused by the fungus, Ceratocystis fimbriata f.sp. platani. This fungus, indigenous to the United States, occurs in urban and forested areas from New Jersey to Georgia and west to Missouri and Louisiana. Other trees affected are the Oriental plane (Platanus orientalis) and London plane (Platanus acerifolia). The disease is most devastating to young trees that may die within two years after becoming...
Alan Iskra Gary Schwetz Dr. Michael A. Valenti
NA-PR-03-01
Insects and Diseases
Pest Alert Cherry Scallop Shell Moth NA-PR-01-96 The cherry scallop shell moth, Hydria prunivorata(Ferguson) is a defoliator of black cherry, and occasionally other native cherries, throughout its range in eastern North America. The moth's name is derived from the pattern of alternating dark and light scalloped lines on the wings.
John R. Omer, Debra Allen-Reid USDA Forest Service
NA-PR-01-96
Insects and Diseases
Pest Alert Common Pine Shoot Beetle NA-TP-05-93 The common (or larger) pine shoot beetle, Tomicus(=Blastophagus) piniperda (L.), was discovered near Cleveland, Ohio in July 1992. As of this writing, it is now in six states: Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, New York, Ohio, and Pennsylvania. Adults of the common pine shoot beetle are cylindrical and range from 3 to 5mm in length (about the size of a match head). Their head and thorax are shiny black while the wing covers are reddish-brown to black. Eggs are 1 mm long, oval, smooth, and shiny white...
Bob Haack USDA FS NCFES, Dan Kucera USDA FS NATechnical
NA-TP-05-93
Insects and Diseases
Pest Alert Diplodia corticola “Bot Canker” of Oak NA-PR-01-17 Diplodia corticola has recently been reported causing tip dieback, branch and stem cankers, and tree mortality of several native oak species in numerous States in the United States.
Martin, Danielle K.; Munck, Isabel
NA-PR-01-17
Insects and Diseases
Trees
Pest Alert Dutch Elm Disease (DED) and the American Elm NA-PR-05-99 A two-page pest alert about Dutch elm disease including symptoms and treatment.
USDA Forest Service, Northeastern Area State and Private Forestry
NA-PR-05-99
Insects and Diseases
Pest Alert Elm Yellows NA- PR-04-12 Pest Alert - Elm yellows, formerly known as elm phloem necrosis, is a lethal systemic disease of native elms caused by a wall-less bacteria. The only known hosts of the elm yellows phytoplasma are elms and insect vectors that transmit this pathogen. In the United States the disease is transmitted by the whitebanded elm leafhopper and possibly other insects that feed on phloem sap.
Martin, Danielle
NA- PR-04-12
Trees
Pest Alert Elongate Hemlock Scale NA-PR-01-02 Pest Alert -The elongate hemlock scale, Fiorinia externa Ferris, native to Japan, is a pest of eastern hemlock, Tsuga canadensis, and Carolina hemlock, T. caroliniana, in the Eastern United States. It has been found in the District of Columbia and in nine states from Virginia to southern New England and west to Ohio. F. externa attacks the lower surface of the hemlock needle, where it removes fluids from the mesophyll cells through piercing and sucking mouthparts.
McClure, Mark S.
NA-PR-01-02
Insects and Diseases
Pest Alert Emerald Ash Borer NA-PR-02-04 Emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) is a wood-boring beetle from Asia that was identified in July 2002 as the cause of widespread ash tree (Fraxinus spp.) decline and mortality in southeastern Michigan and adjacent parts of Ontario, Canada. Larval feeding between the bark and sapwood disrupts transport of nutrients and water in a tree, causing dieback of the branches and eventually death of the tree. Tens of millions of ash trees in forest, rural, and urban areas have already been killed,...
McCullough, Deborah G.; Schneeberger, Noel F.; Katovich, Steven A.; Siegert, Nathan W.
NA-PR-02-04
Insects and Diseases
Pest Alert European Larch Canker NA-FB/P-17 The European larch canker, Lachnelluta willkommii, has been reported on native larch (tamarack) at several locations in New Brunswick and Nova Scotia , Canada, and Washington County, Maine. Some trees 3 to 4 inches (7.6-10.2 cm) in diameter have died from this disease, which can attack all species of the genus Larix and Pseudolarix.
Margaret Miller-Weeks
NA-FB/P-17
Insects and Diseases
Pest Alert Garlic Mustard NA-PR-03-99 Garlic mustard was used as an edible green in Europe and may have been brought to North America by European settlers. The coarsely toothed leaves give off a garlic-like odor when crushed, accounting for its common name and use in cooking. It is a member of the mustard family.
USDA Forest Service Wayne National Forest Rosemarie Boyle 219 Columbus Road Athens, OH 45701 (740)592-0200
NA-PR-03-99
Insects and Diseases
Pest Alert Gypsy Moth NA-PR-05-01 The gypsy moth has been an important pest of hardwoods in the Northeastern United States since its introduction in 1869. Established populations exist in all or parts of 19 states from Maine to Wisconsin and south to Illinois and generally in a southeasterly line from Illinois to northeastern North Carolina
USDA Forest Service, Northeastern Area State and Private Forestry
NA-PR-05-01
Insects and Diseases
Pest Alert Hemlock Borer NA-PR-03-00 Pest Alert - The hemlock borer, (Melanophila fulvoguttata) is a pest of eastern hemlock throughout its natural range. Although normally considered a secondary pest and seldom abundant, the borer can develop to outbreak conditions following wind-throw, drought, excessive stand openings, or attacks by other primary pests such as the hemlock woolly adelgid or hemlock loopers.
USDA Forest Service Northeastern Area State and Private Forestry
NA-PR-03-00
Insects and Diseases
Pest Alert Hemlock Looper NA-PR-05-92 The hemlock looper Lambdina fiscellaria is adefoliating insect native to North America. It occurs in the eastern United States from Maine to Georgia and west to Wisconsin. The larvae can be extremely destructive to hemlock, balsam fir, and white spruce. During an outbreak it will also feed on many other species including: larch, red and black spruce, cedar, jack pine, paper and yellow birch, basswood, maple, elm, and wild cherry. Hemlocks may die after one year of severe defoliation, fir in one...
Maine Forest Service 50 Hospital Street Augusta, ME 04330 (207) 289-2431 USDA
NA-PR-05-92
Insects and Diseases
Pest Alert Hemlock Woolly Adelgid NA-PR-09-05 Native to Asia, the hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae) is a small,aphidlike insect that threatens the health and sustainability of eastern hemlock(Tsuga canadensis) and Carolina hemlock (Tsuga caroliniana) in theEastern United States. Hemlock woolly adelgid was first reported in the Eastern United States in 1951 near Richmond, Virginia. By 2005, it was established in portions of 16 States from Maine to Georgia, where infestations covered about half of the range of hemlock. Areas of...
Unknown
NA-PR-09-05
Insects and Diseases
Pest Alert Japanese Knotweed NA-PR-04-99 Pest Alert - Japanese knotweed is native to Eastern Asia. It appears to require high-light habitats, and does very well along roadways and rivers. It reproduces by seed and large rhizomes, which may reach a length of 40 to 60 feet. This plant is a threat to native vegetation because it often forms dense patches, which shade out all other plants. It is a particular threat in riparian areas where it can survive floods and quickly colonize scoured streambanks.
USDA Forest Service Northeastern Area State and Private Forestryin
NA-PR-04-99
Invasive Plants
Pest Alert Locust Leafminer, Odonatata dorsalis NA-PR-01-01 The locust leafminer is primarily a pest of black locust. The major hosts are black locust and honeylocust. Other tree species (apple, beech, birch, cherry, elm, oak, and hawthorn) are occasionally attacked. The original natural range of black locust is in two sections: 1) the central Appalachian Mountains from central Pennsylvania and southern Ohio south to northeastern Alabama, northern Georgia, and northwestern South Carolina, and 2) the Ozark Plateau of southern Missouri, northern Arkansas...
USDA Forest Service Northeastern Area State and Private Forestry
NA-PR-01-01
Insects and Diseases
Pest Alert MILE-A-MINUTE WEED (Persicaria perfoliata (L.) H. Gross) NA-PR-01-09 Mile-a-minute weed is particularly threatening to forest regeneration by out-competing tree seedlings. It is extremely difficult to eradicate with a single herbicide application due to prolonged seed persistence in the soil.
Wu, Yun
NA-PR-01-09
Invasive Plants
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