FL Springs Trail #B-5065


Area Status: Closed

The FL Springs Trail is a strenuous primitive trail that descends through old growth ponderosa pine for 1 mile before joining the Myrtle Creek Trail #308 at mile 6. 

FL Springs Trail is open to hiking, mountain biking and horse back riding.  OHV riding is prohibited.

A small picnic area is located at the Myrtle Crek Trailhead with fire ring and picnic table. 

Printable Map

At a Glance

Current Conditions: 01/20/2023: Closed; no access. Please remember that if you pack it in, please pack it out with you.
Usage: Light
Restrictions: Motorized vehicles prohibited
Closest Towns: Burns, OR.

General Information

Directions:

From Burns, OR., travel 2.8 miles east on US Highway 20/US Highway 395.  Then make a left turn onto US Highway 395 and head north toward the town of John Day, OR.  Follow US Highway 395 approximately 15.4 miles to the junction with Forest Road 31.  Follow Forest Road 31 for approximately 8.7 miles to the junction with Forest Road 3125.  Follow Forest Road 3125 for approximately 1.9 miles before making a slight right and connecting with the junction of Forest Road 914.  Follow Forest Road 914 approxmiately 1.4 miles to the trailhead.


General Notes:

The roads leading to the trailhead are not signed, it is recommended that visitors bring with them a Forest Service Map or use a GPS unit. 


Recreation Map

Map showing recreational areas. Map Information

Activities

Mountain Biking

The FL Springs Trail is a strenous primitive trail that descends through old growth ponderosa pines for 1 mile before joining the Myrtle Creek Trail #308 at mile 6.  This trail is a trail shared with horse back riders as well as hikers.  Please be prepared to share the trail.

Day Hiking

The FL Springs Trail is a strenuous primitive trail that descends through old growth ponderosa pines for 1 mile before joining Myrtle Creek Trail #308 at around mile 6.  Hikers can enjoy a quiet walk along Myrtle Creek enjoying stands of ponderosa pine, beautiful willows and interesting geological features.  The trail is used by hores back and mountain bike riders, please be prepared to share the trail.

Horse Riding

Horse back riders will enjoy a quiet ride along Myrtle Creek near stands of old growth ponderosa pine, beautiful willows and during the spring and early summer riders will see many varieties of wild flowers.  The trail is a sternuous primitive trail that descends for about 1 mile before joining the Myrtle Creek Trail #308 allowing access to a longer trail and further opportunities for nature viewing as well as wildlife viewing.  This trail is shared with hikers and mountain bike riders, please be prepared to share the trail.

Viewing Wildlife

Wildlife is abundant in the area, ranging from big game animals such as prong horn antelope and mule deer to a wide variety of birds and smaller creatures such as squirrels and chipmunks.  Rattle snakes also call this area home, please be mindful when hiking.

Viewing Plants

This trail travels through old growth ponderosa pine for the first mile and then connects to Myrtle Creek Trail #308.  From the Myrtle Creek Trail #308 visitors will see a variety of plants along Myrtle Creek, including willows and spring wildflowers. 

Viewing Scenery

This trail travels along Myrtle Creek allowing visitors the opportunity to see eroding outcroppings of welded tuft which offer glimpses of geological forces that shaped this region.

Recreation Areas

Recreation Activities

Highlights

Location

 
  Latitude : 
43.897278

  Longitude : 
-119.098667

  Elevation : 
5100