Hazel Creek Campground


Area Status: Open

Hazel Creek is in a remote area without cell phone service.  This primitive campground is popular with OHV/ATV riders, equestrians, and mountain bikers. 

There is a trailhead for the Ozark Trail is on the road leading into the campground.

Hazel Creek is part of the Old Lead Belt, where much of the nation’s lead ore was once mined. This site features a foundation from a historic lead smelter.

The Trail of Tears National Historic Trail goes through the site.

At a Glance

Current Conditions: Recent test results indicate that there may be some health risk to children six and younger from exposure to lead in areas around the smelter. While potential health risks continue to be assessed, you can reduce risk of exposure when in the area by:
  • Washing face and hands before eating
  • Not allowing children six and younger to play in the dirt and tailings (sand-like material left over after the metals have been extracted from the mineral rocks that contained them.)
  • Washing tailings and dust off toys, clothing, vehicles, etc before returning home
Area Amenities: Accessible,Tent camping,Camping trailer,Picnic tables,Parking
Fees: No fees
Open Season: January - December
Usage: Light
Restrictions:
  • Fireworks are prohibited.
  • Dogs must be on a 6 foot leash in the campground.
  • Only collect dead and downed wood for campfires. 
  • No trash containers; please pack out all your trash.
  • OHVs cannot go on the Ozark Trail
Closest Towns: Belgrade, Caledonia, Viburnum
Water: None
Restroom: None
Operated By: USDA Forest Service
Information Center: Potosi-Fredericktown Ranger District
Email | Phone and Address

General Information

Directions:

From Potosi,

From the intersection of MO State Hwy 21 and MO State Hwy 8 in Potosi,

  • head West on Hwy 8 approx. 0.2 mile to Hwy P.
  • Turn Left onto Hwy P and head West/South for approx. 14 miles to Hwy C.
  • Turn Right onto Hwy C and head West for approx. 4.1 miles to Hwy Z on your right.
  • Turn Right and head North onto Hwy Z (aka Brazil Rd/Co Rd 657) for approx. 3.1 miles to the campground entrance on your left.

Accessibility:

Tables, lantern posts, and fire rings are accessible

 

Recreation Map

Map showing recreational areas. Map Information

Activities

Mountain Biking

Trace Creek Section of the Ozark Trail

This section of the Ozark Trail is approximately 24 miles long and is open to foot, mountain bike, and equestrian traffic. From Hazel Creek in the north, it runs south crossing hollows, ridgetops, small streams, and several highways, ending at Hwy.

Courtois Section of the Ozark Trail

This 45-mile long section includes 7.5 miles of state land north of the Narrows Trailhead, crosses private land at the Bass Resort, follows the Berryman Trail from about mile 22 through mile 32, and connects to the Trace Creek Section on the south at the Hazel Creek Trailhead.

Dispersed Camping

There are 10 individual sites with parking spurs, firerings, tables, and lantern posts, but no drinking water, toilets, or regular mowing.

Dispersed camping is the term used for free camping anywhere in the National Forest OUTSIDE of a designated campground.

Dispersed camping means there are no toilets, no structures, no trash cans, no treated water, and no fire grates.

There are extra responsibilities required for this type of camp. It's a must to educate yourself before you try it, but we hope the adventure of dispersed camping in the Mark Twain National Forest calls to you!

  1. Pick a Campsite and follow the Leave No Trace Principles
  2. Camp 100 feet away from trails and water sources.
  3. Treat any water found in the area before consuming it.
  4. Human waste (Feces) must be buried at least 6 inches deep and covered.
  5. Pack out all of your garbage.

For more information on Dispersed Camping visit our dispersed camping page which has information on picking a campsite, how to protect water quality, and campfires!

Day Hiking

Trace Creek Section of the Ozark Trail

This section of the Ozark Trail is approximately 24 miles long and is open to foot, mountain bike, and equestrian traffic. From Hazel Creek in the north, it runs south crossing hollows, ridgetops, small streams, and several highways, ending at Hwy.

Courtois Section of the Ozark Trail

This 45-mile long section includes 7.5 miles of state land north of the Narrows Trailhead, crosses private land at the Bass Resort, follows the Berryman Trail from about mile 22 through mile 32, and connects to the Trace Creek Section on the south at the Hazel Creek Trailhead.

Backpacking

Trace Creek Section of the Ozark Trail

This section of the Ozark Trail is approximately 24 miles long and is open to foot, mountain bike, and equestrian traffic. From Hazel Creek in the north, it runs south crossing hollows, ridgetops, small streams, and several highways, ending at Hwy.

Courtois Section of the Ozark Trail

This 45-mile long section includes 7.5 miles of state land north of the Narrows Trailhead, crosses private land at the Bass Resort, follows the Berryman Trail from about mile 22 through mile 32, and connects to the Trace Creek Section on the south at the Hazel Creek Trailhead.

Horse Camping

Horses are welcome in this primitive campground. Some spurs are large enough to accommodate horse trailers.

There are 10 individual sites with parking spurs, firerings, tables, and lantern posts, but no drinking water, toilets, or regular mowing. Hazel Creek is suitable for watering stock.

Hitching posts are provided. Do not tie horses directly to trees; if not utilizing hitching posts, use a high line. Scatter manure and leftover hay outside of the campsite.

Horse Riding

Trace Creek Section of the Ozark Trail

This section of the Ozark Trail is approximately 24 miles long and is open to foot, mountain bike, and equestrian traffic. From Hazel Creek in the north, it runs south crossing hollows, ridgetops, small streams, and several highways, ending at Hwy.

Courtois Section of the Ozark Trail

This 45-mile long section includes 7.5 miles of state land north of the Narrows Trailhead, crosses private land at the Bass Resort, follows the Berryman Trail from about mile 22 through mile 32, and connects to the Trace Creek Section on the south at the Hazel Creek Trailhead.

Interpretive Areas

Hazel Creek is part of the Old Lead Belt, where much of the nation’s lead ore was once mined. This site features a foundation from a historic lead smelter.

The Trail of Tears National Historic Trail goes through the site. An interpretive sign is available with information on the trail.

Amenities

Camping trailer: Yes
Picnic tables: Yes
Tent camping: Yes
Parking:
Accessible: Some features and amenities are accessible

Recreation Areas

Recreation Activities

Location

 
  Latitude : 
37.837533

  Longitude : 
-91.01600533