Siskiyou Wilderness

Area Status: Open
This area is Open
 

Preston Peak in the Siskiyou Wilderness

The forested mountains, valleys and meadows of the Siskiyou Wilderness in Del Norte, Humboldt and Siskiyou counties of northwestern California offer vistas of incredible beauty, diverse scenery and limitless opportunities for solitude.

The Wilderness, named for the mountains that cross it, is administered by three national forests: Six Rivers, Klamath and Siskiyou.

Rain falling in the Siskiyou Wilderness (from 40" on lower eastern slopes to 200" on the high western slopes) drains into three watersheds: the Smith, Klamath, and Illinois Rivers. The Siskiyou Wilderness is unique in that some parts can be accessed year round in the lower elevations, providing opportunities for recreation not found elsewhere. July through mid-October is the best time to travel in the wilderness, although severe weather can occur in any month. Access to some trails may be restricted to summer months because of snow and/or seasonal road closures to prevent the spread of Port-Orford-cedar root disease. Summer temperatures can reach into the 90s.

Siskiyou Wilderness Landscape Trail to Flat Iron Lake Flat Iron Lake in the Siskiyou Wilderness A wildflower in the Siskiyou Wilderness Devil

At a Glance

Operational Hours: Access into the Siskiyou Wilderness may be difficult due to snow in the high country.
Usage: Light
Restrictions: Remember, travel in wilderness areas is restricted to foot or horseback. No motorized or mechanical equipment (e.g. chainsaws, bicycles) is allowed.

General Information

General Notes:

The Wilderness, named for the mountains that cross it, is administered by three National Forests: Six Rivers, Klamath and Siskiyou.

Rain falling in the Siskiyou Wilderness (from 40" on lower eastern slopes to 200" on the high western slopes) drains into three watersheds: the Smith, Klamath, and Illinois Rivers. The Siskiyou Wilderness is unique in that some parts can be accessed year round in the lower elevations, providing opportunities for recreation not found elsewhere. July through mid-October is the best time to travel in the wilderness, although severe weather can occur in any month. Access to some trails may be restricted to summer months because of snow and/or seasonal road closures to prevent the spread of Port-Orford-cedar root disease. Summer temperatures can reach into the 90s.

The Siskiyou is a light to moderately used wilderness with most use concentrated along major trail systems and mountain lakes, particularly Young's Valley, Doe Flat, Buck Lake, Devil's Punchbowl, South Kelsey Trail near Elk Horn Bar, Summit Valley, Little Bear Valley and Kelly Lake. The most heavily used area in the wilderness is Kelly Lake.

The Siskiyou Wilderness high country holds religious and cultural significance to Native Americans. Certain areas within the wilderness have been determined to be eligible for the National Register of Historic Places.

The slim steep canyons, slender ridge tops and dense brush inhibit travel off of established trails. But hikers will find many trail options for trekking into the wilderness. You'll find opportunities for full or half day hikes as well as weeklong backpacking or equestrian trips. (Forage is limited and stock feed is advisable.) Some trails are primitive and receive light use and require a high degree of back country skills to negotiate safely. Others are well marked National Recreation Trails. Do your research, and then choose the trail that matches your skills and the type of experience you're seeking.

Remember, travel in wilderness areas is restricted to foot or horseback. No motorized or mechanical equipment (e.g. chainsaws, bicycles) is allowed.


General Notes:

The Wilderness, named for the mountains that cross it, is administered by three National Forests: Six Rivers, Klamath and Siskiyou.

Rain falling in the Siskiyou Wilderness (from 40" on lower eastern slopes to 200" on the high western slopes) drains into three watersheds: the Smith, Klamath, and Illinois Rivers. The Siskiyou Wilderness is unique in that some parts can be accessed year round in the lower elevations, providing opportunities for recreation not found elsewhere. July through mid-October is the best time to travel in the wilderness, although severe weather can occur in any month. Access to some trails may be restricted to summer months because of snow and/or seasonal road closures to prevent the spread of Port-Orford-cedar root disease. Summer temperatures can reach into the 90s.

The Siskiyou is a light to moderately used wilderness with most use concentrated along major trail systems and mountain lakes, particularly Young's Valley, Doe Flat, Buck Lake, Devil's Punchbowl, South Kelsey Trail near Elk Horn Bar, Summit Valley, Little Bear Valley and Kelly Lake. The most heavily used area in the wilderness is Kelly Lake.

The Siskiyou Wilderness high country holds religious and cultural significance to Native Americans. Certain areas within the wilderness have been determined to be eligible for the National Register of Historic Places.

The slim steep canyons, slender ridge tops and dense brush inhibit travel off of established trails. But hikers will find many trail options for trekking into the wilderness. You'll find opportunities for full or half day hikes as well as weeklong backpacking or equestrian trips. (Forage is limited and stock feed is advisable.) Some trails are primitive and receive light use and require a high degree of back country skills to negotiate safely. Others are well marked National Recreation Trails. Do your research, and then choose the trail that matches your skills and the type of experience you're seeking.

Remember, travel in wilderness areas is restricted to foot or horseback. No motorized or mechanical equipment (e.g. chainsaws, bicycles) is allowed.


General Notes:

The Siskiyou is a light to moderately used wilderness with most use concentrated along major trail systems and mountain lakes, particularly Youngs Valley, Doe Flat, Buck Lake, Devils Punchbowl, South Kelsey Trail near Elk Horn Bar, Summit Valley, Little Bear Valley and Kelly Lake. The most heavily used area in the wilderness is Kelly Lake.

The Siskiyou Wilderness high country holds religious and cultural significance to Native Americans. Certain areas within the wilderness have been determined to be eligible for the National Register of Historic Places.

The slim steep canyons, slender ridge tops and dense brush inhibit travel off of established trails. But hikers will find many trail options for trekking into the wilderness. You'll find opportunities for full or half day hikes as well as weeklong backpacking or equestrian trips. Forage is limited and stock feed is advisable. Some trails are primitive and receive light use and require a high degree of back country skills to negotiate safely. Others are well marked National Recreation Trails. Do your research, and then choose the trail that matches your skills and the type of experience you’re seeking.


General Notes:

The Wilderness, named for the mountains that cross it, is administered by three National Forests: Six Rivers, Klamath and Siskiyou.

Rain falling in the Siskiyou Wilderness (from 40" on lower eastern slopes to 200" on the high western slopes) drains into three watersheds: the Smith, Klamath, and Illinois Rivers. The Siskiyou Wilderness is unique in that some parts can be accessed year round in the lower elevations, providing opportunities for recreation not found elsewhere. July through mid-October is the best time to travel in the wilderness, although severe weather can occur in any month. Access to some trails may be restricted to summer months because of snow and/or seasonal road closures to prevent the spread of Port-Orford-cedar root disease. Summer temperatures can reach into the 90s.

The Siskiyou is a light to moderately used wilderness with most use concentrated along major trail systems and mountain lakes, particularly Young's Valley, Doe Flat, Buck Lake, Devil's Punchbowl, South Kelsey Trail near Elk Horn Bar, Summit Valley, Little Bear Valley and Kelly Lake. The most heavily used area in the wilderness is Kelly Lake.

The Siskiyou Wilderness high country holds religious and cultural significance to Native Americans. Certain areas within the wilderness have been determined to be eligible for the National Register of Historic Places.

The slim steep canyons, slender ridge tops and dense brush inhibit travel off of established trails. But hikers will find many trail options for trekking into the wilderness. You'll find opportunities for full or half day hikes as well as weeklong backpacking or equestrian trips. (Forage is limited and stock feed is advisable.) Some trails are primitive and receive light use and require a high degree of back country skills to negotiate safely. Others are well marked National Recreation Trails. Do your research, and then choose the trail that matches your skills and the type of experience you're seeking.

Remember, travel in wilderness areas is restricted to foot or horseback. No motorized or mechanical equipment (e.g. chainsaws, bicycles) is allowed.


General Notes:

The Wilderness, named for the mountains that cross it, is administered by three National Forests: Six Rivers, Klamath and Siskiyou.

Rain falling in the Siskiyou Wilderness (from 40" on lower eastern slopes to 200" on the high western slopes) drains into three watersheds: the Smith, Klamath, and Illinois Rivers. The Siskiyou Wilderness is unique in that some parts can be accessed year round in the lower elevations, providing opportunities for recreation not found elsewhere. July through mid-October is the best time to travel in the wilderness, although severe weather can occur in any month. Access to some trails may be restricted to summer months because of snow and/or seasonal road closures to prevent the spread of Port-Orford-cedar root disease. Summer temperatures can reach into the 90s.

The Siskiyou is a light to moderately used wilderness with most use concentrated along major trail systems and mountain lakes, particularly Young's Valley, Doe Flat, Buck Lake, Devil's Punchbowl, South Kelsey Trail near Elk Horn Bar, Summit Valley, Little Bear Valley and Kelly Lake. The most heavily used area in the wilderness is Kelly Lake.

The Siskiyou Wilderness high country holds religious and cultural significance to Native Americans. Certain areas within the wilderness have been determined to be eligible for the National Register of Historic Places.

The slim steep canyons, slender ridge tops and dense brush inhibit travel off of established trails. But hikers will find many trail options for trekking into the wilderness. You'll find opportunities for full or half day hikes as well as weeklong backpacking or equestrian trips. (Forage is limited and stock feed is advisable.) Some trails are primitive and receive light use and require a high degree of back country skills to negotiate safely. Others are well marked National Recreation Trails. Do your research, and then choose the trail that matches your skills and the type of experience you're seeking.

Remember, travel in wilderness areas is restricted to foot or horseback. No motorized or mechanical equipment (e.g. chainsaws, bicycles) is allowed.


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Location

 
  Latitude : 
41.731738

  Longitude : 
-123.699869

 

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