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The integrated landscape assessment project

Formally Refereed
Authors: Miles A. Hemstrom, Janine Salwasser, Joshua Halofsky, Jimmy Kagan, Cyndi Comfort
Year: 2012
Type: General Technical Report (GTR)
Station: Pacific Northwest Research Station
Source: In: Kerns, Becky K.; Shlisky, Ayn J.; Daniel, Colin J., tech. eds. Proceedings of the First Landscape State-and-Transition Simulation Modeling Conference, June 14–16, 2011, Portland, Oregon. Gen. Tech. Rep. PNW-GTR-869. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station: 57-72.

Abstract

The Integrated Landscape Assessment Project (ILAP) is a three-year effort that produces information, models, data, and tools to help land managers, policymakers, and others examine mid- to broad-scale (e.g., watersheds to states and larger areas) prioritization of land management actions, perform landscape assessments, and estimate potential effects of management actions for planning and other purposes. ILAP provides wall-to-wall, cross-ownership geospatial data and maps on existing, potential and future vegetation conditions, land ownership and management allocation classes, and other landscape attributes. State and transition models integrate vegetation development, management actions, natural disturbances, and climate change to allow users to examine the mid- and long-term effects of alternative management, disturbance, and climate scenarios. State-and-transition model (STM) outputs are used to produce information on many landscape characteristics, including vegetation conditions, disturbance regimes, fuel conditions, wildlife habitats, and economic values of natural resourcerelated products in Arizona, New Mexico, Oregon, and Washington. The project consists of science delivery (e.g., state and transition models, spatial data) and knowledge discovery (e.g., new linkages to wildlife habitat relations, fuel treatment economics, aboveground carbon pools, biomass, water supplies, and trends in wildfire and fuel conditions) that are integrated through decision support systems. The spatial data, state and transition models, model outputs, and interpretations cover all major upland vegetation types, including forests, woodlands, shrublands, grasslands, and deserts. To date, more than 50 GIS layers and 250 unique state and transition models have been produced across the 4-state area (over 117 million hectares). ILAP data, models, and tools will be accessible through a Western Landscapes Explorer portal to be publicly launched in 2012 (INR and OSU Libraries 2012). Products from ILAP can be used by land managers, program managers, analysts, planners, and policymakers to evaluate management strategies that reduce wildfire risk, improve habitat, generate revenues, benefit rural communities, and inform restoration investment decisions. Because it allows for integration of many natural resource management objectives, ILAP facilitates collaborative landscape planning over very large areas. ILAP methods should be widely applicable for all lands.

Parent Publication

Keywords

landscape assessment, science delivery, knowledge discovery, vegetation models, decision support.

Citation

Hemstrom, Miles A.; Salwasser, Janine; Halofsky, Joshua; Kagan, Jimmy; Comfort, Cyndi. 2012. The integrated landscape assessment project. In: Kerns, Becky K.; Shlisky, Ayn J.; Daniel, Colin J., tech. eds. Proceedings of the First Landscape State-and-Transition Simulation Modeling Conference, June 14 16, 2011, Portland, Oregon. Gen. Tech. Rep. PNW-GTR-869. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station: 57-72.
https://www.fs.usda.gov/research/treesearch/42569