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Spatial synchrony of insect outbreaks

Formally Refereed
Authors: A.M. Liebhold, K.J. Haynes, O.N. Bjørnstad
Year: 2012
Type: Book Chapter
Station: Northern Research Station
Source: Chapter 6. In: Barbosa, Pedro; Letourneau, Deborah K.; Agrawal, Anurag A., eds. Insect outbreaks revisited. First edition. Hoboken, NJ: Blackwell Publishing: 113-125.

Abstract

The concept of "spacial synchrony" refers to the tendency of tbe densities of spatially disjunct populations to be correlated in time (Bjornstad et al. 1999a, Liebhold et al. 2004). Oucbreaking forest insects offer many of the classic examples of this phenomenon (Figure 6.1). The spatial extent of synchrony of outbreaks is probably one of the most important - yet most underappreciated - characteristics that cause certain insect species to be classified as noxious pests. Locally eruptive population behavior alone would rarely qualify a species for "outbreak" status. Rather, regionalization of eruptions is what elevates ecological and socioeconomic impacts of certain species to high levels of concern, which gives them pest status.

Citation

Liebhold, Andrew M.; Haynes, Kyle J.; Bj rnstad, Ottar N. 2012. Spatial synchrony of insect outbreaks. Chapter 6. In: Barbosa, Pedro; Letourneau, Deborah K.; Agrawal, Anurag A., eds. Insect outbreaks revisited. First edition. Hoboken, NJ: Blackwell Publishing: 113-125.
https://www.fs.usda.gov/research/treesearch/54213