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Shedding light on shedded cells: Using eDNA sampling for surveillance of invasive species

Informally Refereed
Authors: Jeffrey Morisette, Stas Burgiel, Thomas Franklin, Taylor Wilcox
Year: 2022
Type: Science Bulletins and Newsletters
Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
Source: Connected Science. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 2 p.

Abstract

Invasive species cause billions of dollars of economic losses and other damage every year in the United States. Environmental DNA (eDNA) sampling can help managers determine whether a problem species is present in an area, even when its numbers are low or it is hard to observe. This capability makes it a powerful tool for early detection and monitoring. The National Invasive Species Council (NISC), recognizing eDNA sampling as a promising tool for invasive species surveillance and management, began in 2020 to look for ways to make this tool more tangible for managers. Rocky Mountain Research Station (RMRS) researchers who helped build the National Genomics Center for Wildlife and Fish Conservation (NGC) eDNA Program worked with an interagency team to publish a framework that describes the ins and outs of using eDNA sampling as a tool in invasive species management. The framework is the culmination of the work of nearly 30 Federal scientists and invasive species specialists.

Keywords

Connected Science, invasive species, environmental DNA, eDNA, sampling

Citation

Morisette, Jeffrey; Burgiel, Stas; Franklin, Thomas; Wilcox, Taylor. 2022. Shedding light on shedded cells: Using eDNA sampling for surveillance of invasive species. Connected Science. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 2 p.
https://www.fs.usda.gov/research/treesearch/64779