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This Science You Can Use article describes the potential benefits of mastication as a forest management tool, presented in the form of a set of decision trees that can guide land managers in choosing the right treatment option for a particular site and management objective.
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New emission factor updates to FOFEM will allow land managers to estimate emissions of hazardous air pollutants, which may be combined with ambient monitoring to assess fire fighter exposure.
A recent General Technical Report describes how Q methodology can collect stakeholder input in a way that is engaging, thorough, and scientifically rigorous, helping forest planners identify different perspectives or values, as well as areas of agreement by stakeholders.
The Landscape Change Monitoring System (LCMS) is an important new dataset and tool that allows the user to create landscape scale historical disturbance maps.
  The After Fire Toolkit provides managers, landowners, and communities with online guidance for assessing and preventing potential damage due to postfire flooding and related events.
A brand-new Carbon Monitoring System (CMS) developed by RMRS researchers promises to be a valuable resource to support the U.S. Forest Service’s Shared Stewardship Initiative’s goals and policy makers calculating carbon budgets.
A recent General Technical Report describes how Q methodology can collect stakeholder input in a way that is engaging, thorough, and scientifically rigorous. This process can help forest planners identify different perspectives as well as areas of agreement by stakeholders, including the public.
The Rocky Mountain Research Station (RMRS) develops and delivers innovative science and technology to improve lives and landscapes. RMRS conducts research focused on the issues of today, applying knowledge gained from decades of prior research to contemporary problems. This document showcases a selection of innovative, impactful research aligned with the 2020 Research & Development Priority Areas.  
Scientists from the Rocky Mountain Research Station, Colorado Forest Restoration Institute, and Rocky Mountain Tree Ring Research reconstructed historical forest conditions in Front Range forests that had adapted to survive frequent fire prior to 1860.

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