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Fire intensity-Fuel reduction relationships associated with understory burning in Larch/Douglas-fir stands

Posted date: December 19, 2018
Publication Year: 
1976
Authors: Norum, Rodney A.
Document type: Other Documents

Citation

Norum, Rodney A. 1976. Fire intensity-Fuel reduction relationships associated with understory burning in Larch/Douglas-fir stands. In: Tall Timbers fire ecology conference No. 14; symposium proceedings; 1974 October 8–10; Missoula, MT. Tallahassee, FL: Tall Timbers Research Station. U.S. Government Printing Office. p. 559–572.

Description

Fire has been called everything from bad to good, from friendly hero to villainous foe. Sometimes, it is too naively called natural. The simple fact is that fire is. As long as our climate in the Northern Rocky Mountains remains essentially unchanged, we will have photosynthesis working to produce biomass at rates greater than decomposition can convert that biomass. The result is an accumulation of fuels, the stuff of which fire is made. Fire is natural, and through time it has become biologically correct because plant species have adapted to recurring fires.