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Sagebrush ecosystems are a major component of western U.S. landscapes and they provide vital habitat to a wide array of wildlife species, including greater sage-grouse and pygmy rabbits. However, in recent decades, sagebrush ecosystems have been reduced or degraded by a wide range of disturbances, including human development, overgrazing, severe fires, and encroachment by cheatgrass and pinyon-juniper woodlands. These factors are expected to...
Presentation by Megan Friggens and Katelyn Driscoll given at First Friday All Climate Change Talks on March 2, 2018.
Presentation given by Katelyn Driscoll entitled "Use of airborne digital imagery to examine floodplain complexity at varying discharges."
Shared stewardship is about working together in an integrated way to make decisions for the land. The USDA Forest Service (USFS) works collaboratively with stakeholders to set landscape-scale priorities and to invest in projects that will have the most impact. USFS Research & Development has played a key role in developing and supporting the USDA Shared Stewardship Strategy. Shared stewardship has always been, and will always be, a part of...
Wildfires, an important natural disturbance in southwestern ecosystems, can present challenges to resource managers, communities, and private landowners when they burn areas subject to post-fire flooding and erosion. Many government agencies and research institutions have developed science and management tools for estimating post-fire effects and mitigating risks in burned landscapes.
Mastication, a method once used almost exclusively by utility companies to reduce vegetation beneath power lines, is now also regarded as a useful treatment for preparing a site for planting, releasing sapling-sized trees, or reducing surface fuels in fire-prone forest ecosystems. However, not all mastication treatments are the same. Land managers must consider a number of factors when designing a mastication project, including can the site...
This powerpoint is from the December 2017 Riparian and Wetland Assessment Workshop. It is part of the Riparian, wetland, and groundwater-dependent ecosystems: Assessments of current conditions in relation to natural range of variation for National Forests in the Intermountain Region (R4) project. 
The powerpoint comes from the May 2019 Society for Freshwater Science Annual Meeting. It is part of the Riparian, wetland, and groundwater-dependent ecosystems: Assessments of current conditions in relation to natural range of variation for National Forests in the Intermountain Region (R4) project. 
The National Grassland Council has prepared an audiovisual presentation about the history and value of our National Grasslands. GSD Research Ecologist Jackie Ott, Rapid City and member of the National Grassland Council, helped to prepare the presentation which she narrates. The presentation takes 10 minutes and is a fascinating account of the homesteading period, 1930’s Dust Bowl, formation of the national grasslands, and their current multiple...
May 2019 Science You Can Use (in 5 min) 

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