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Geography: Coconino National Forest

Costs and benefits of multiple data sources in monitoring programs

Science Spotlights Posted on: September 04, 2019
Model development combining multiple data sources to leverage data source strengths and for improved parameter precision has increased, but with limited discussion on precision gain versus effort. Some data sources take more effort than others, thus knowing how much improvement is gained with these monitoring metrics is important for allocating samples on the landscape. Our framework allows research and monitoring programs to evaluate optimal use of limited funds when multiple data sources are available within the study design phase to meet study objectives.

Soil fungi recover slowly following high-severity wildfires

Science Spotlights Posted on: August 21, 2019
Soil fungi are important components of the soil microbial community that influence ecosystem resilience and stability after disturbances such as fire. Ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi increase water and nutrient uptake for their plant hosts in return for carbon. Saprotrophic fungi play an important role in nutrient cycling and are responsible for decomposing wood, plant litter, and soil organic matter. 

Understanding and replicating historical spatial patterns is important to create forests that are resilient to fire and other disturbances

Science Spotlights Posted on: August 21, 2019
Researchers are increasingly recognizing that ponderosa pine forests naturally occur in clumps of trees with isolated single trees in a matrix of non-forested openings. Turns out that this spatial pattern is important in sustaining ecological processes such as fire spread, tree growth and regeneration, and creates biodiversity and wildlife habitat. Yet, most past studies have examined spatial patterns on small plots, which underestimates the sizes of tree groups and openings.

Remnant old-growth ponderosa pine forests provide insights on spatial patterns

Science Spotlights Posted on: August 06, 2019
Researchers are increasingly recognizing that ponderosa pine forests naturally occur in clumps of trees with isolated single trees in a matrix of non-forested openings. It turns out that this spatial pattern is important in sustaining ecological processes such as fire spread, tree growth and regeneration, and creates biodiversity and wildlife habitat. Yet, most past studies have examined spatial patterns on small plots, which underestimates the sizes of tree groups and openings.  

High soil temperature data archive

Projects Posted on: June 07, 2018
High Soil Temperature Data Archive - From Prescribed Fires and Wildfires across the Western US.

Recreating in color: Promoting ethnic diversity on public lands

Documents and Media Posted on: May 30, 2018
Recent studies of the Forest Service’s National Visitor Use Monitoring (NVUM) data show a wide disparity in racial and ethnic use of national forests. Researchers at the Rocky Mountain Research Station in Fort Collins, Colorado, are studying NVUM numbers systematically and hope that their research will help National Forest System staff to encourage different racial and ethnic groups to connect with public natural lands. Document Type: Other Documents

Fire patterns in piñon and juniper in the Western United States: Trends from 1984 through 2013

Science Spotlights Posted on: May 15, 2018
Changes in fire patterns for piñon and juniper vegetation in the western United States were analyzed over a 30-year period. This is the first evaluation of its type.

What drives low-severity fire in the southwestern United States?

Science Spotlights Posted on: May 15, 2018
Dry conifer forests in the Western United States historically had low impact surface fires approximately every five to 30 years. Due to more than 100 years of successful fire exclusion, however, many of these forests are now denser, and therefore have a greater probability of experiencing intense fires that burn entire stands and convert forests to non-forest landscapes. What environmental conditions are necessary to promote low-severity fire in dry conifer forests? Causes and consequences of high-severity fires are increasingly being studied but little to no research has focused on factors that promote low-severity fires, until now.

Seeing red: New tools for mapping and understanding fire severity

Pages Posted on: May 14, 2018
Large, severe fires are ecologically and socially important because they have lasting effects on vegetation and soils, can potentially threaten people and property, and can be costly to manage. The goals of the Fire Severity Mapping Project(FIRESEV), which covers lands in the continental western United States, are to understand where and why fires burn severely, and to give fire managers, fire ecologists, and natural resource managers tools to assess severity before, during, and after a wildfire. FIRESEV has produced a suite of tools for a wide range of fire management applications, including real-time forecasts and assessments in wildfire situations, post-wildfire rehabilitation efforts, and long-term planning.

Can FIA soils data improve models predicting ponderosa pine density in the Southwest?

Projects Posted on: August 25, 2017
Puhlick et al. (2012) evaluated the influence of numerous abiotic and biotic factors on ponderosa pine regeneration densities in the southwestern United States. The study described here will use newly released soils data from the Forest Inventory and Analysis program to test the influence of soils and other variables on ponderosa pine seedling densities.

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