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Geography: Coconino National Forest

Birds and Burns Network

Projects Posted on: February 16, 2016
The Rocky Mountain Research Station is leading the effort to examine fire effects on populations and habitats of wildlife in dry mixed conifer forests in eight states across the western United States, including locations on National Forests, National Parks, and state and private lands. The goal of the Birds and Burns Network is to understand the ecological consequences of wildland fire, bark beetle disturbance, and forest management for wildlife in dry mixed conifer forests.

National forest contributions to streamflow: Southwestern Region (Region 3)

Pages Posted on: February 05, 2016
Maps and text files for each national forest in the Southwestern Region (Region 3) to illustrate the importance of national forest water yield to regional water quality and water quantity.

Climate change vulnerability assessments and related literature for aquatic ecosystems: Arizona

Pages Posted on: February 01, 2016
This page lists climate change vulnerability assessments and studies with a specific focus on aquatic systems within Arizona. This list does not necessarily include larger, more regionally based studies and assessments that also have relevance to this state.

Beaver Creek Experimental Watershed: Research on fuel treatment effects

Projects Posted on: January 04, 2016
In the mid-2000's researchers reinstated research at Beaver Creek Experimental Watershed (BCEW) to collect data on climate, stream flow, vegetation, forest floor, and soil conditions. The Southwest Watershed Science Team and Northern Arizona University are exploring the effects of fuel treatments on stream flow, vegetation, forest floor, and soil conditions at the BCEW. The main goal of ongoing research is to provide land managers with information about the ecological effects of fuel treatments in the ponderosa pine forests and pinyon-juniper woodlands at a watershed scale.

Research at Beaver Creek

Media Gallery Posted on: December 31, 2015
The Southwest Watershed Science Team is engaged in the Beaver Creek Experimental Watershed study outside of Flagstaff, Arizona. There is over 20 years of hydrologic, climatic, vegetation, fuels, soils, and wildlife data from the 1950s through the 1980s which provide background for the study. In the mid-2000's researchers reinstated the project to collect data on climate, stream flow, vegetation, forest floor, and soil conditions.

Beaver Creek Experimental Watershed: Research on forest management, streamflow, and forage production

Projects Posted on: December 31, 2015
The Beaver Creek Experimental Watershed outside of Flagstaff, Arizona is home to over 20 years of hydrologic, climatic, vegetation, fuels, soils, and wildlife data. This data is informing research initiated in the mid-2000's by the Southwest Watershed Science Team and Northern Arizona University to explore the effects of fuel treatments on stream flow, vegetation, forest floor, and soil conditions.

The 2010 Schultz Fire

Pages Posted on: December 28, 2015
The Schultz Fire burned over 15,000 acres of the Coconino National Forest near Flagstaff, Arizona in June 2010.

Fire and fire-surrogate study: Soil moisture availability

Projects Posted on: December 15, 2015
Forests in the western United States are more dense and have more down fuels now than under historic conditions, mostly due to anthropogenic influences such as grazing and fire-suppression. Managers have recognized this problem and have acted to reduce stem density and fuels by thinning, burning, and/or fuel treatments. This Fire and Fire-Surrogate (FFS) study evaluates prescribed fire, thinning, and various mechanical treatment methods for treating, removing, or using woody biomass.

Southwest Watershed Science Team

Groups Posted on: December 15, 2015

Dynamics of coarse woody debris in southwestern mixed-conifer and ponderosa pine forests

Projects Posted on: October 09, 2015
Snags (standing dead trees) and logs are important components of forest landscapes. RMRS scientists established a series of fixed plots in 1997 for monitoring snag populations. This research has direct ramifications for 11 national forests throughout the Southwestern Region, as well as for our overall understanding of the ecology of coarse woody debris and effects of climate change on forest structure and composition.

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