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Geography: Fishlake National Forest

Using “good” fires to reduce “bad” fire effects and smoke impacts

Science Spotlights Posted on: August 29, 2019
The broad consensus among fire and fuel scientists and managers is that we need to reduce hazardous fuel accumulations on many more acres to mitigate the risk and severity of wildfires. But mechanical fuel treatments are expensive! Prescribed fire is a more cost effective tool to reduce fuel loads and to restore and maintain fuel conditions to something closer to the historical norm.

Fire and Smoke Model Evaluation Experiment (FASMEE): Fishlake National Forest prescribed burn

Media Gallery Posted on: July 08, 2019
The Fire and Smoke Model Evaluation Experiment (FASMEE) is a large-scale interagency effort to identify how fuels, fire behavior, fire energy and meteorology interact to determine the dynamics of smoke plumes, the long-range transport of smoke and local fire effects such as soil heating and vegetative response. FASMEE is designed to collect observations from large prescribed fires by combining Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR), radar, ground monitoring, aircraft and satellite imagery, and weather and atmospheric measurements.

Fire and Smoke Model Evaluation Experiment (FASMEE): Fishlake National Forest prescribed burn

Projects Posted on: July 03, 2019
The Fire and Smoke Model Evaluation Experiment (FASMEE) is a large-scale interagency effort to identify how fuels, fire behavior, fire energy and meteorology interact to determine the dynamics of smoke plumes, the long-range transport of smoke and local fire effects such as soil heating and vegetative response. FASMEE is designed to collect observations from large prescribed fires by combining Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR), radar, ground monitoring, aircraft and satellite imagery, and weather and atmospheric measurements. Knowing more about how wildland fire operates helps land managers better predict fire behavior, smoke impacts, and the short- to long-term effects of fire. It also promotes increased public and firefighter safety and aids in the allocation of firefighting resources.

Assessment of Region 4 Riparian and Wetland Ecosystems

Documents and Media Posted on: June 19, 2019
This powerpoint is from the December 2017 Riparian and Wetland Assessment Workshop. It is part of the Riparian, wetland, and groundwater-dependent ecosystems: Assessments of current conditions in relation to natural range of variation for National Forests in the Intermountain Region (R4) project.  Document Type: Presentations

Riparian and groundwater-dependent ecosystems of the U.S. Forest Service Intermountain Region: Assessment of management issues and current conditions

Documents and Media Posted on: June 19, 2019
The powerpoint comes from the May 2019 Society for Freshwater Science Annual Meeting. It is part of the Riparian, wetland, and groundwater-dependent ecosystems: Assessments of current conditions in relation to natural range of variation for National Forests in the Intermountain Region (R4) project.  Document Type: Presentations

Riparian, wetland, and groundwater-dependent ecosystems: Assessments of current conditions in relation to natural range of variation for National Forests in the Intermountain Region (R4)

Projects Posted on: June 18, 2019
The researchers are completing a series of riparian and groundwater-dependent ecosystem assessments for National Forests in the USFS Intermountain Region. Each assessment summarizes drivers, stressors, and current condition of these systems in relation to the natural range of variation within each forest. The reports directly inform the assessment phase of forest plan revision and continue to be produced on a schedule in line with the Region’s forest planning process.

Recreating in color: Promoting ethnic diversity on public lands

Documents and Media Posted on: May 30, 2018
Recent studies of the Forest Service’s National Visitor Use Monitoring (NVUM) data show a wide disparity in racial and ethnic use of national forests. Researchers at the Rocky Mountain Research Station in Fort Collins, Colorado, are studying NVUM numbers systematically and hope that their research will help National Forest System staff to encourage different racial and ethnic groups to connect with public natural lands. Document Type: Other Documents

Fire patterns in piñon and juniper in the Western United States: Trends from 1984 through 2013

Science Spotlights Posted on: May 15, 2018
Changes in fire patterns for piñon and juniper vegetation in the western United States were analyzed over a 30-year period. This is the first evaluation of its type.

Seeing red: New tools for mapping and understanding fire severity

Pages Posted on: May 14, 2018
Large, severe fires are ecologically and socially important because they have lasting effects on vegetation and soils, can potentially threaten people and property, and can be costly to manage. The goals of the Fire Severity Mapping Project(FIRESEV), which covers lands in the continental western United States, are to understand where and why fires burn severely, and to give fire managers, fire ecologists, and natural resource managers tools to assess severity before, during, and after a wildfire. FIRESEV has produced a suite of tools for a wide range of fire management applications, including real-time forecasts and assessments in wildfire situations, post-wildfire rehabilitation efforts, and long-term planning.

Semiochemical repellents reduce spruce beetle infestations

Science Spotlights Posted on: August 23, 2017
The spruce beetle is the most significant mortality agent of spruce in western North America. Management options are limited but an effective semiochemical repellent could be economically and environmentally advantageous, compared to insecticide applications, for protection single trees and small stands.

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