You are here

Geography: Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest

Seeding native species to promote ecosystem recovery after fire

Science Spotlights Posted on: July 24, 2019
The use of prescribed fire to reduce expansion of pinyon and juniper to sagebrush ecosystems is a commonly used by managers but can have unwanted consequences. In this Joint Fire Sciences Program Demonstration Project, we show how seeding native species after prescribed fire can decrease invasion of nonnative annual grasses in sites with low resistance.

Assessment of Region 4 Riparian and Wetland Ecosystems

Documents and Media Posted on: June 19, 2019
This powerpoint is from the December 2017 Riparian and Wetland Assessment Workshop. It is part of the Riparian, wetland, and groundwater-dependent ecosystems: Assessments of current conditions in relation to natural range of variation for National Forests in the Intermountain Region (R4) project.  Document Type: Presentations

Riparian and groundwater-dependent ecosystems of the U.S. Forest Service Intermountain Region: Assessment of management issues and current conditions

Documents and Media Posted on: June 19, 2019
The powerpoint comes from the May 2019 Society for Freshwater Science Annual Meeting. It is part of the Riparian, wetland, and groundwater-dependent ecosystems: Assessments of current conditions in relation to natural range of variation for National Forests in the Intermountain Region (R4) project.  Document Type: Presentations

Riparian, wetland, and groundwater-dependent ecosystems: Assessments of current conditions in relation to natural range of variation for National Forests in the Intermountain Region (R4)

Projects Posted on: June 18, 2019
The researchers are completing a series of riparian and groundwater-dependent ecosystem assessments for National Forests in the USFS Intermountain Region. Each assessment summarizes drivers, stressors, and current condition of these systems in relation to the natural range of variation within each forest. The reports directly inform the assessment phase of forest plan revision and continue to be produced on a schedule in line with the Region’s forest planning process.

High soil temperature data archive

Projects Posted on: June 07, 2018
High Soil Temperature Data Archive - From Prescribed Fires and Wildfires across the Western US.

Recreating in color: Promoting ethnic diversity on public lands

Documents and Media Posted on: May 30, 2018
Recent studies of the Forest Service’s National Visitor Use Monitoring (NVUM) data show a wide disparity in racial and ethnic use of national forests. Researchers at the Rocky Mountain Research Station in Fort Collins, Colorado, are studying NVUM numbers systematically and hope that their research will help National Forest System staff to encourage different racial and ethnic groups to connect with public natural lands. Document Type: Other Documents

Fire patterns in piñon and juniper in the Western United States: Trends from 1984 through 2013

Science Spotlights Posted on: May 15, 2018
Changes in fire patterns for piñon and juniper vegetation in the western United States were analyzed over a 30-year period. This is the first evaluation of its type.

Seeing red: New tools for mapping and understanding fire severity

Pages Posted on: May 14, 2018
Large, severe fires are ecologically and socially important because they have lasting effects on vegetation and soils, can potentially threaten people and property, and can be costly to manage. The goals of the Fire Severity Mapping Project(FIRESEV), which covers lands in the continental western United States, are to understand where and why fires burn severely, and to give fire managers, fire ecologists, and natural resource managers tools to assess severity before, during, and after a wildfire. FIRESEV has produced a suite of tools for a wide range of fire management applications, including real-time forecasts and assessments in wildfire situations, post-wildfire rehabilitation efforts, and long-term planning.

Does basin wildrye (Leymus cinereus) show local adaptation when deployed according to generalized provisional seed zones in the Central Basin and Range ecoregion?

Projects Posted on: April 20, 2018
Efforts to deploy genetically appropriate plant materials build on the concept of local adaptation, that is, the intent to match adaptive genetic characteristics to variation in ecological clines pertinent to plant establishment and persistence. Here, basin wildrye (Leymus cinereus (Scribn. & Merr.) Á. Löve) sources from 25 wild populations are planted at four test sites representing the species distribution across generalized provisional seed zones in the Central Basin and Range ecoregion. The study evaluates the utility of provisional seed zones as a means of matching seed sources to restoration sites.

Factors effecting emergence of 20 Great Basin native forbs when sown at depths typical of rangeland drills

Projects Posted on: April 20, 2018
This study evaluated the effects of species, sowing depth and dormancy status, and the treatment effect of row cover on field emergence of 20 forbs native to the Great Basin. Implemented at three sites in 2013 and 2014, forb seeds were sown at four planting depths within the expected variation of the Kemmerer Rangeland or Truax Rough Rider drills.

Pages