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Geography: Idaho

Sustainability across boundaries: The Greater Yellowstone Area climate action plan

Documents and Media Posted on: November 17, 2015
The Greater Yellowstone Area climate action plan describes baseline greenhouse gas emissions and goals to reduce the operational footprint of federal land management agencies that are members of the Greater Yellowstone Coordinating Committee (National Park Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the U.S. Forest Service). Document Type: Other Documents

Stream temperature and thermal networks: A GIS and remote sensing approach to assess aquatic habitat

Documents and Media Posted on: November 06, 2015
This presentation describes a project estimating stream temperature at the drainage basin scale by relating stream temperature to physical landscape variables (e.g., elevation, shading, valley bottom confinement, etc.). Document Type: Presentations

Comparison of two models for identifying low gradient, unconfined streams and valley bottom extent in support of stream temperature modeling associated with fire effects

Documents and Media Posted on: November 06, 2015
This poster describes a project comparing two algorithms to delineate wide, flat valley bottoms using Digital Elevation Model (DEM) data as input: (1) an algorithm developed by the RMRS Boise Aquatic Lab and (2) one developed by the Forest Service Remote Sensing Applications Center. Document Type: Presentations

Comparison of methods for estimating stream channel gradient using GIS

Documents and Media Posted on: November 06, 2015
This presentation describes the ecological importance of stream channel gradient for the Middle Fork Salmon River Watershed in Idaho and compares three methods (at contour crossings, stream intersections, and equal intervals) for estimating channel gradient from Digital Elevation Models (DEM) and the National Hydrography Dataset (NHD). Document Type: Presentations

Estimating valley confinement using DEM data to support cutthroat trout research

Documents and Media Posted on: November 06, 2015
This presentation introduces the Valley Confinement Algorithm (VCA) and describes the importance of valley confinement in estimating habitat for cutthroat trout. Initial applications of the VCA to the Middle Fork Boise River Watershed in Idaho are also discussed. Document Type: Presentations

Use of Thematic Mapper satellite imagery, hemispherical canopy photography, and digital stream lines to predict stream shading

Documents and Media Posted on: November 06, 2015
This presentation describes a project estimating incident solar radiation at the stream surface, at the landscape scale, to help understand observed differences in water temperature on the Middle Fork Boise River Watershed in Idaho. Document Type: Presentations

Debris flow mapping through time: Data management using ArcGIS and implications for fish research

Documents and Media Posted on: November 06, 2015
This presentation covers research on debris flows on the Middle Fork Boise River Watershed on the Boise National Forest in Idaho. Scientists mapped debris flow using aerial photography, Digital Elevation Models (DEM), and the TARDEM software. Document Type: Presentations

Predicting future spruce beetle infestations

Science Spotlights Posted on: October 05, 2015
In recent decades, bark beetle disturbances are increasing in extent and severity across western forests. Causes and consequences of spruce beetle (Dendroctonus rufipennis) infestation are important to the management of Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmannii) forests. Forest Service scientists modeled the effects of increased temperatures and changing forest stand conditions, such as density and species composition, on the likelihood of spruce beetle infestation over time. Findings from this study are being incorporated into management guidelines for silviculturists who wish to mitigate spruce beetle infestation by modifying the density or composition of Engelmann spruce forests in the Interior West.

Mountain pine beetle impacts on fire behavior

Science Spotlights Posted on: October 05, 2015
Beetle-killed trees lose their needles over time, and once all the needles have dropped, crown fire danger largely disappears. However, red-needled trees have lower foliar moisture contents than healthy trees, which leads to increased crown fire potential. This research provides insights into the potential use of fuel treatments in beetle-killed forests, increases firefighter awareness of dangerous situations, and assists managers in identifying areas at high risk for ignition and extreme fire behavior.

Frequently asked questions about the mountain pine beetle epidemic

Pages Posted on: September 29, 2015
Answers to frequently asked questions about the mountain pine beetle epidemic, including information for homeowners and descriptions of ongoing research.

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