You are here

Geography: Oregon

Providing science-based information for future conservation and management efforts of sagebrush ecosystems

FS News Posted on: February 23, 2016
USDA Forest Service scientists and managers who work with sagebrush and sage-grouse prepared this assessment that summarizes the agency's strengths, capabilities, partners, past and current research, and potential future priority research areas for the conservation and restoration of sagebush ecosystems and sage-grouse.

Birds and Burns Network

Projects Posted on: February 16, 2016
The Rocky Mountain Research Station is leading the effort to examine fire effects on populations and habitats of wildlife in dry mixed conifer forests in eight states across the western United States, including locations on National Forests, National Parks, and state and private lands. The goal of the Birds and Burns Network is to understand the ecological consequences of wildland fire, bark beetle disturbance, and forest management for wildlife in dry mixed conifer forests.

Genetic diversity and genecology of squirreltail (Elymus elymoides)

Projects Posted on: February 09, 2016
Squirreltail (Elymus elymoides) can rapidly colonize disturbed sites, is relatively fire-tolerant, and is a potential competitor with medusahead (Taeniatherum caput-medusae) and cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum). Determining the extent to which adaptive genetic variation is related to climatic variation is needed to ensure that the proper germplasm is chosen for revegetation and restoration. This study provides (1) seed zones and seed transfer guidelines for developing adapted plant materials of squirreltail for revegetation and restoration in the Great Basin and adjacent areas and (2) guidelines for conservation of germplasm within the National Plant Germplasm System.

Genetic diversity of prairie junegrass (Koeleria macrantha)

Projects Posted on: February 09, 2016
Good drought tolerance and fibrous roots make prairie junegrass (Koeleria macrantha) beneficial for revegetation and erosion control on mined lands, over septic systems, in construction areas, on burned sites, and in other disturbed areas. There is a need for greater genetic knowledge of this species to ensure adapted populations are used for restoration and revegetation projects. This study provides (1) seed zones and seed transfer guidelines for developing adapted plant materials of prairie junegrass for revegetation and restoration in the Great Basin and adjacent areas and (2) guidelines for conservation of germplasm within the National Plant Germplasm System.

Testing the efficacy of seed zones for re-establishment and adaptation of bluebunch wheatgrass (Pseudoroegneria spicata)

Projects Posted on: February 09, 2016
Previous research funded by the Great Basin Native Plant Project found that bluebunch wheatgrass (Pseudoroegneria spicata) populations differed in traits important for adaptation to precipitation and temperature (St. Clair et al. 2013). Forest Service scientists hypothesize that in the long-term, populations from local seed zones will better establish, survive, and reproduce than those from non-local seed zones. This study examines the efficacy of seed zones for bluebunch wheatgrass to ensure successful establishment and allow for long-term adaptation by maintaining genetic diversity.

National forest contributions to streamflow: Pacific Northwest Region (Region 6)

Pages Posted on: February 05, 2016
Maps and text files for each national forest in the Pacific Northwest Region (Region 6) to illustrate the importance of national forest water yield to regional water quality and water quantity.

The range-wide bull trout eDNA project

Projects Posted on: February 04, 2016
The bull trout has a historical range that encompasses many waters across the Northwest. Though once abundant, bull trout have declined in many locations and is now federally listed and protected under the Endangered Species Act. Rocky Mountain Research Station scientists initiated the range-wide bull trout eDNA project in partnership with biologists from more than 20 organizations to create sound and precise information about the distribution of bull trout in thousands of streams across their range.

Climate change vulnerability assessments and related literature for aquatic ecosystems: Oregon and Washington

Pages Posted on: February 01, 2016
This page lists climate change vulnerability assessments and studies that mention aquatic systems in Oregon and Washington. This is not a comprehensive review of literature for the Northwestern states because our literature search was not focused on this region.

Climate change vulnerability assessments and related literature for aquatic ecosystems: Northwest region

Pages Posted on: February 01, 2016
This page lists climate change vulnerability assessments and studies that mention aquatic system in the Northwest region within the U.S. This area includes Oregon an Washington.

Climate change vulnerability assessments and related literature for aquatic ecosystems: Western U.S.

Pages Posted on: February 01, 2016
This page lists climate change vulnerability assessments and studies that mention aquatic systems in the western region of the U.S.

Pages