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Geography: Pike National Forest

Severe wildfire has long-term consequences for stream water quality

Science Spotlights Posted on: September 24, 2018
Severe wildfires remove vegetation and organic soil layers and expose watersheds to erosion which can transport large quantities of soil and ash to nearby rivers and streams. But once the burned areas have stabilized, do severe wildfires have any longer-lasting effects on watersheds or water quality? This study follows the Hayman Fire, 2002, Colorado, and shows that yes, there are long-term effects.

Warming and Warnings: Assessing Climate Change Vulnerability in the Rocky Mountain Region

Documents and Media Posted on: July 26, 2018
This special Science You Can Use Bulletin is a companion to the recently published general technical report addressing climate change vulnerability in the Rocky Mountain Region. Document Type: Other Documents

Recreating in color: Promoting ethnic diversity on public lands

Documents and Media Posted on: May 30, 2018
Recent studies of the Forest Service’s National Visitor Use Monitoring (NVUM) data show a wide disparity in racial and ethnic use of national forests. Researchers at the Rocky Mountain Research Station in Fort Collins, Colorado, are studying NVUM numbers systematically and hope that their research will help National Forest System staff to encourage different racial and ethnic groups to connect with public natural lands. Document Type: Other Documents

Fire patterns in piñon and juniper in the Western United States: Trends from 1984 through 2013

Science Spotlights Posted on: May 15, 2018
Changes in fire patterns for piñon and juniper vegetation in the western United States were analyzed over a 30-year period. This is the first evaluation of its type.

Seeing red: New tools for mapping and understanding fire severity

Pages Posted on: May 14, 2018
Large, severe fires are ecologically and socially important because they have lasting effects on vegetation and soils, can potentially threaten people and property, and can be costly to manage. The goals of the Fire Severity Mapping Project(FIRESEV), which covers lands in the continental western United States, are to understand where and why fires burn severely, and to give fire managers, fire ecologists, and natural resource managers tools to assess severity before, during, and after a wildfire. FIRESEV has produced a suite of tools for a wide range of fire management applications, including real-time forecasts and assessments in wildfire situations, post-wildfire rehabilitation efforts, and long-term planning.

Building resilience in Colorado Front Range forests for the future

Pages Posted on: February 22, 2018
The recently published "Principles and Practices for the Restoration of Ponderosa Pine and Dry Mixed-Conifer Forests of the Colorado Front Range" (RMRS-GTR-373) provides a synthesis of information specific to Colorado’s Front Range, while outlining a framework to guide forest management and treatment design criteria that can be used by land managers far and wide. This Science You Can Use (in 5 minutes) highlights the main themes of this approach to place-based restoration.

Back to the future: Building resilience in Colorado Front Range forests using research findings and a new guide for restoration of ponderosa and dry-mixed conifer landscapes

Pages Posted on: February 15, 2018
In 1860, a typical ponderosa pine forest along the Colorado Front Range was open enough to ride a horse through, weaving between spread out clumps of trees. Today, these forests are crowded with smaller trees, which makes them vulnerable to severe wildfires, insect epidemics and disease. This synthesis highlights ways to increase the health and resilience of current forests, while also strengthening forests against future disturbances. While restoration treatments are not expected to re-create the diversity of structure in the 1860s, the hope is that by pushing the stand structure of these forests -towards conditions more typical of the past, they will be more resilient for the future.

Building Resilience in Colorado Front Range Forests

Documents and Media Posted on: February 01, 2018
The recently published "Principles and Practices for the Restoration of Ponderosa Pine and Dry Mixed-Conifer Forests of the Colorado Front Range" (RMRS-GTR-373) provides a synthesis of information specific to Colorado’s Front Range, while outlining a framework to guide forest management and treatment design criteria that can be used by land managers far and wide. This Science You Can Use (in 5 minutes) highlights the main themes of this approach to place-based restoration. Document Type: Other Documents

Back to the Future: Building resilience in Front Range forests

Documents and Media Posted on: February 01, 2018
This Science You Can Use Bulletin highlights a new science-based framework for Colorado Front Range forest restoration. Document Type: Other Documents

Ecological impacts of collaborative forest restoration treatments

Science Spotlights Posted on: January 23, 2018
New novel study expands the scope of monitoring efforts in one of the first USDA Forest Service Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Program (CFLRP) landscapes, Colorado’s Front Range. Results from this study highlight both the effective aspects of restoration treatments, and the importance of initiating and continuing collaborative science-based monitoring to improve the outcomes of forest restoration efforts.  

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