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Geography: Salmon-Challis National Forest

Assessment of Region 4 Riparian and Wetland Ecosystems

Documents and Media Posted on: June 19, 2019
This powerpoint is from the December 2017 Riparian and Wetland Assessment Workshop. It is part of the Riparian, wetland, and groundwater-dependent ecosystems: Assessments of current conditions in relation to natural range of variation for National Forests in the Intermountain Region (R4) project.  Document Type: Presentations

Riparian and groundwater-dependent ecosystems of the U.S. Forest Service Intermountain Region: Assessment of management issues and current conditions

Documents and Media Posted on: June 19, 2019
The powerpoint comes from the May 2019 Society for Freshwater Science Annual Meeting. It is part of the Riparian, wetland, and groundwater-dependent ecosystems: Assessments of current conditions in relation to natural range of variation for National Forests in the Intermountain Region (R4) project.  Document Type: Presentations

Riparian, wetland, and groundwater-dependent ecosystems: Assessments of current conditions in relation to natural range of variation for National Forests in the Intermountain Region (R4)

Projects Posted on: June 18, 2019
The researchers are completing a series of riparian and groundwater-dependent ecosystem assessments for National Forests in the USFS Intermountain Region. Each assessment summarizes drivers, stressors, and current condition of these systems in relation to the natural range of variation within each forest. The reports directly inform the assessment phase of forest plan revision and continue to be produced on a schedule in line with the Region’s forest planning process.

Research runs through it: A fresh look at Wild and Scenic Rivers

Documents and Media Posted on: October 02, 2018
As the Forest Service and other agencies prepare for the next half-century of managing Wild and Scenic Rivers, scientists at the Rocky Mountain Research Station and the Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute are partnering with National Forests and university collaborators to use new research protocols to help revise river management plans. Document Type: Other Documents

Recreating in color: Promoting ethnic diversity on public lands

Documents and Media Posted on: May 30, 2018
Recent studies of the Forest Service’s National Visitor Use Monitoring (NVUM) data show a wide disparity in racial and ethnic use of national forests. Researchers at the Rocky Mountain Research Station in Fort Collins, Colorado, are studying NVUM numbers systematically and hope that their research will help National Forest System staff to encourage different racial and ethnic groups to connect with public natural lands. Document Type: Other Documents

Seeing red: New tools for mapping and understanding fire severity

Pages Posted on: May 14, 2018
Large, severe fires are ecologically and socially important because they have lasting effects on vegetation and soils, can potentially threaten people and property, and can be costly to manage. The goals of the Fire Severity Mapping Project(FIRESEV), which covers lands in the continental western United States, are to understand where and why fires burn severely, and to give fire managers, fire ecologists, and natural resource managers tools to assess severity before, during, and after a wildfire. FIRESEV has produced a suite of tools for a wide range of fire management applications, including real-time forecasts and assessments in wildfire situations, post-wildfire rehabilitation efforts, and long-term planning.

Wildland fire: Nature's fuel treatment

Pages Posted on: March 06, 2018
Every year wildland fires affect much more acreage in the United States compared to controlled burns. Like controlled burns, wildland fire can help promote biological diversity and healthy ecosystems. But despite these facts, wildland fire is not often considered as a fuel treatment in the United States. Scientists working with the U.S. Forest Service’s Rocky Mountain Research Station have evaluated more than 40 years of satellite imagery to determine what happens when a fire burns into a previously burned area. Results from this research are helping land managers to assess whether a previous wildland fire will act as a fuel treatment based on the length of time since the previous fire and local conditions such as ecosystem type, topography, and fire weather conditions.

Region 4 Science Partner Program: Socioeconomic Assessment and Forest Plan Revision on the Salmon-Challis National Forest

Projects Posted on: June 15, 2017
RMRS researcher Nate Anderson will work directly with SCNF's Gina Knudson to augment the Forest's socioeconomic expertise during the forest plan revision process. The goal of this partnership is to broaden the Forest's expertise during the forest plan revision process. The collaboration between the Salmon-Challis National Forest and the RMRS Human Dimensions program is an excellent opportunity to directly serve the needs of the Forest and agency, more broadly.

National forest climate change maps: your guide to the future

Projects Posted on: April 17, 2017
The National Forest Climate Change Maps project was developed to meet the need of National Forest managers for information on projected climate changes at a scale relevant to decision making processes, including Forest Plans.  The maps use state-of-the-art science and are available for every National Forest in the contiguous United States with relevant data coverage. Currently, the map sets include variables related to precipitation, air temperature, snow (including April 1 snow-water equivalent (SWE) and snow residence time), and stream flow.

Stream water quality after a fire

Projects Posted on: April 07, 2017
Wildland fires in the arid west create a cause for concern for many inhabitants and an area of interest for researchers. Wildfires dramatically change watersheds, yielding floods and debris flows that endanger water supplies, human lives, and valuable fish habitats.

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