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Geography: Southwestern Region (R3)

Partnership Goals

Pages Posted on: April 25, 2019
CoMFRT Research Team in North Central Washington. There is no such thing as a univer

Partnership Overview

Pages Posted on: April 25, 2019
“There is no one size-fits-all solution to reducing wildfire risk. Solutions must be tailored to landscapes and communities.” ~ National Cohesive Wildland Fire Management Strategy

New research provides scientific framework for conserving iconic sagebrush landscapes

FS News Posted on: April 15, 2019
An unprecedented conservation effort is underway across 11 Western states to address threats to sagebrush ecosystems and the many species that depend on them. Today, the Department of Agriculture and the Department of Interior released the Science Framework for Conservation and Restoration of the Sagebrush Biome (Part 2). The Science Framework provides a transparent, ecologically responsible approach for making policy and management decisions for sagebrush landscapes.

A science framework for conservation and restoration of the sagebrush biome - Management applications

Science Spotlights Posted on: April 12, 2019
An unprecedented conservation effort is underway across 11 Western states to address threats to sagebrush ecosystems and the many species that depend on them. Today, the Department of Agriculture and the Department of Interior released the Science Framework for Conservation and Restoration of the Sagebrush Biome (Part 2). The Science Framework provides a transparent, ecologically responsible approach for making policy and management decisions for sagebrush landscapes.

Developing pollinator-dependent plant materials for use in a growing restoration economy

Projects Posted on: March 08, 2019
Located on the Sierra Ancha Experimental Forest, this project uses a common garden approach to determine which plant species are best suited for supporting pollinator communities and are most appropriate for restoration activities. Findings from the study will be used to 1) improve pollinator habitat, 2) increase seed stocks of native flowering species for use in restoration, 3) inform U.S. seed zone guidelines and 4) help predict plant-pollinator response to climate change. This carries on a long tradition at the Sierra Ancha Experimental Forest of using common gardens in botanical research. As far back as the 1920s and 30s common gardens were used to study evapotranspiration rates of native herbaceous and shrub species as well as evaluate the potential use of certain species for erosion control. Some of these the same gardens are now being restored nearly a century later for use in this study.

100 years of vegetation change at the Sierra Ancha Experimental Forest

Projects Posted on: March 08, 2019
This project incorporates historical data collected at the Sierra Ancha Experimental Forest nearly 100 years ago to determine how plant communities have changed over that period of time.

Sierra Ancha Experimental Forest Vegetation Mapping Project

Projects Posted on: March 08, 2019
The Sierra Ancha Experimental Forest (SAEF) Vegetation Mapping Project uses unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) to create highly detailed vegetation maps using Structure From Motion technology.  These maps are then used to overlay historical vegetation maps made nearly 100 years ago to determine how vegetation has changed over the last century.

Facilitating pre-season planning to identify control opportunities and high priority areas

Projects Posted on: February 13, 2019
District and Forest Fire staff recently met with local cooperators and resource specialists to develop maps of potential control lines that they could use while managing a fire. Maps of control lines and potential operational delineations (PODs) are being developed for the entire Forest with the assistance of researchers from USFS Rocky Mountain Research Station and the Colorado Forest Restoration Institute.

Rocky Mountain Research Station Forest Inventory & Analysis (FIA)

Pages Posted on: December 20, 2018
  The Rocky Mountain Research Station Forest Inventory & Analysis Program conducts multi-resource inventories in the Interior West states of Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming.

Forest changes during fire exclusion are rapid and have profound effects

Science Spotlights Posted on: October 12, 2018
The 20th Century was a period of enormous change for western forests. Fire used to maintain distinct forest vegetation communities – pine, dry mixed-conifer, mesic mixed-conifer, and spruce-fir – in close proximity to one another along steep vertical gradients in the topographically diverse forests of the American Southwest. How did these forests change in response to fire exclusion? In what ways and how rapidly? What are the consequences of these changes? It is important to provide context for the condition of today’s forests, but more importantly, how can this information help today’s managers?

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