You are here

Geography: Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest

Beetle pheromones and maple volatiles reduce spruce beetle attacks on spruce trees

Science Spotlights Posted on: August 21, 2019
The spruce beetle is the most significant mortality agent of spruce in western North America, and management options are limited. In cooperation with FHP partners, a novel combination of a beetle-produced pheromone (MCH) and compounds from a non-host (maple) tree (AKB) were shown to be repellent to spruce beetles. High-release rate MCH-AKB devices that are attached to live spruce can reduce spruce beetle attacks on individual trees and small groups of trees.

Recreating in color: Promoting ethnic diversity on public lands

Documents and Media Posted on: May 30, 2018
Recent studies of the Forest Service’s National Visitor Use Monitoring (NVUM) data show a wide disparity in racial and ethnic use of national forests. Researchers at the Rocky Mountain Research Station in Fort Collins, Colorado, are studying NVUM numbers systematically and hope that their research will help National Forest System staff to encourage different racial and ethnic groups to connect with public natural lands. Document Type: Other Documents

Fire patterns in piñon and juniper in the Western United States: Trends from 1984 through 2013

Science Spotlights Posted on: May 15, 2018
Changes in fire patterns for piñon and juniper vegetation in the western United States were analyzed over a 30-year period. This is the first evaluation of its type.

Seeing red: New tools for mapping and understanding fire severity

Pages Posted on: May 14, 2018
Large, severe fires are ecologically and socially important because they have lasting effects on vegetation and soils, can potentially threaten people and property, and can be costly to manage. The goals of the Fire Severity Mapping Project(FIRESEV), which covers lands in the continental western United States, are to understand where and why fires burn severely, and to give fire managers, fire ecologists, and natural resource managers tools to assess severity before, during, and after a wildfire. FIRESEV has produced a suite of tools for a wide range of fire management applications, including real-time forecasts and assessments in wildfire situations, post-wildfire rehabilitation efforts, and long-term planning.

Region 4 Science Partner Program: Adapting rangeland monitoring strategies

Projects Posted on: July 10, 2017
There is a growing need for cost-effective tools that enable researchers to efficiently monitor and evaluate rangeland systems. RMRS researchers are partnering with the Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest to enhance existing monitoring and modeling strategies, which assess rangeland conditions. This project will expand the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) user base, develop remote monitors, and build collaborative relationships inside and outside of the National Forest System.

National forest climate change maps: your guide to the future

Projects Posted on: April 17, 2017
The National Forest Climate Change Maps project was developed to meet the need of National Forest managers for information on projected climate changes at a scale relevant to decision making processes, including Forest Plans.  The maps use state-of-the-art science and are available for every National Forest in the contiguous United States with relevant data coverage. Currently, the map sets include variables related to precipitation, air temperature, snow (including April 1 snow-water equivalent (SWE) and snow residence time), and stream flow.

Stream water quality after a fire

Projects Posted on: April 07, 2017
Wildland fires in the arid west create a cause for concern for many inhabitants and an area of interest for researchers. Wildfires dramatically change watersheds, yielding floods and debris flows that endanger water supplies, human lives, and valuable fish habitats.

National flow gage gap analysis

Projects Posted on: March 16, 2017
Flow gages* record discharge in streams and rivers across the U.S. but the extent and adequacy of this monitoring network relative to USFS lands has not been documented. To address that deficiency, the medium resolution National Hydrography Layer was used with gage location information from the National Water Information System to describe the monitoring network and how it has changed through time.

Mapping climate refugia to preserve cold-water biodiversity using crowd-sourced databases

Science Spotlights Posted on: September 20, 2016
Concerns about climate change effects on cold-water biodiversity sparked broad multi-agency collaborative efforts throughout the American West. U.S. Forest Service research teams led development of massive interagency databases that now enable precise mapping of critical habitats and species distributions in streams flowing through 101 National Forests.

Forecasting the influence of climate change on invasive weeds and weed biological control

Science Spotlights Posted on: February 10, 2016
Rocky Mountain Research Station scientists are investigating how climate change, namely elevated levels of CO2, might impact invasive species and classical biological control of weeds. A mechanistic approach to understanding how climate change may impact interactions between invasive plants and their biocontrol agents is essential for realistically addressing management needs under likely future field conditions.

Pages